WWW.NEW.PDFM.RU
    -
 

 >>  -
Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 |

Part I , 24 2017 . : 5 , ...

-- [ 1 ] --

201 EX/5

Part I

, 24 2017 .

:

5

,

I

,

,

.

I :

A .

() B .

22- C .

(-22) () D .

-21 -22 E .

F .

, () G .



() H .

I .

201 EX/5 Part I (A) , 21 2017 .

: 5 , I A. () 196 EX/5.I.B, 197 EX/5.I.D 199 EX/5.I.A, 201- () .

   

A .

() ( 196 EX/5.I.B, 197 EX/5.I.D 199 EX/5.I.A)

( 1 .

+20) û ( ) , . , , . - , , . .

, 2 .

, . , : ( JIU/REP/2016/7). () 69/288 70/202 1 .

- ( 37 C/1 (V) ). 196- ( 196 EX/5 Part I (B)). 196 EX/5.I.B 197- 2014-2017 ., ( 197 EX/5 Part I (D) 197 EX/5.INF) .

4 .

199- ( 197 EX/5.I.D). . , , , 38 C/5, . 200- ( 199 EX/5.INF.REV Part I) .

, 197 EX/5.I.D 5 .

() . , 72- ( ) .

201 EX/5 Part I (A) page 2 , , , , , . 200- (200 EX/5.INF). , , ,

, . 200 EX/5.I.A 202- .

, 197 EX/5.I.D 6 .

SISTER 38 C/5 û . 38 C/5 , .

197 EX/5.I.D 199 EX/5.I.A, 7 .

201- (). . 2014 . 2021 . 38 C/5 2016 . SISTER - 38 C/5 . , .

SISTER 38 C/5 , . - http://www.unesco.org/new/en/sids-report-2016/. 199 EX/5.INF.REV , , 38 C/5, - , 2016 . , , .

9 .

. , , . , , . 201 EX/5 Part I (A) page 3 , , , , .

10. , , , , , , , , , , , . .

11. , . , 39 C/5, .

12. , 2017 . (-23 ), 6 17 2017 . , . .

13. , , , 2030 , 2015-2030 ., ( ) .

:

14 .

,

   

, () 2014-2021 . (37 C/4), () ;

   

HIGHLIGHTS ON THE PROGRESS ACHIEVED TOWARDS THE FIRST PHASE OF

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SIDS ACTION PLAN WITHIN THE 38 C/5

For priority 1 on Enhancing island capacities to achieve sustainable development through education and the reinforcement of human and institutional capacities, the following progress

has been achieved:

SIDS national capacities were strengthened to develop and implement policies and plans within a lifelong learning framework, in particular with a policy review completed in Saint Kitts and Nevis and another policy review for Bahamas launched. Support was also provided to Haiti for the design and implementation of the Educational Management Information Systems (EMIS). UNESCO has been supporting SIDS to develop national ICT in education policies and master plans through organizing national workshops followed by technical advices on the finalization of the polices, with Fiji, Jamaica, Mauritius, and Seychelles benefiting from the supports recently and having developed their policies and master plans. The ICT in Education Policy of Jamaica has been approved by the government .

With support from UNESCO, the Government of Jamaica customized UNESCOs ICT Competency Framework for Teacher (ICT-CFT) in 2016 and plans to apply it in local teacher institutions .

Capacities of SIDS Member States were strengthened to design and implement policies aimed at transforming TVET. Notably, Saint Lucia has developed a new TVET policy. This was informed by a TVET policy review, conducted with the support of UNESCO, to be published in February 2017. In addition, through UNESCO-UNEVOC, a flagship TVET Leadership Programme was put into practice to support a better understanding and institutional policy implementation of the 2030 sustainable development agenda, in particular SDG4 and in line with the UNESCO Strategy for TVET (2016Twenty-two mid-level to senior TVET leaders from 19 countries, including Barbados, Fiji and Jamaica, were trained. The programme enhanced participants leadership and managerial capacities. In addition, five UNEVOC Centres have been engaged in implementing capacity development programmes for TVET leaders, teachers and trainers in all three priority areas of the TVET Strategy .

Four of these programmes have been fully implemented and 83 teachers and trainers were trained in Asia and the Pacific, including from Fiji and Kiribati .

UNESCO has also been providing technical support to reinforce teacher education and professional development in SIDS. In particular, UNESCO has supported Cuba and the Dominican Republic to assess and review their teacher standards on the basis of UNESCOs Regional Strategy on Teachers. This has resulted in a set of recommendations for decision-makers, which are being adapted and contextualized to the national educational environment in both countries. In addition, UNESCO has been delivering support on teacher education in Fiji, Samoa, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu with the aim to increase the number of teachers with teaching qualifications. Within two years, a number of training workshops on professional standards and competency frameworks, as well as in-service teacher training has supported the work of teachers, principals, and education officials .

UNESCO supports SIDS in implementing the Global Action Programme (GAP) on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), the follow-up to the United Nations Decade of ESD: 250 ASPnet schools from 25 countries including three SIDS (Dominican Republic, Cabo Verde and Haiti) participated in developing and implementing ESD whole-school action plans with a particular focus on climate change. UNESCO held an international training of trainers on the whole-institution approach to climate change (21-23 November 2016, Dakar, Senegal) for 40 national project coordinators and school facilitators. As second training will follow in March 2017. Teacher education institutions from Mauritius participate in a capacity-building programme to integrate ESD in their pre- and in-service training at secondary school level. Youth from 10 SIDS were identified to participate in a training programme on ESD Youth Leadership. Several SIDS will be involved in capacity-building session to integrate ESD and SDGs at local level .

201 EX/5 Part I (A) Annex page 2

In the area of Priority 2 on Enhancing SIDS resilience towards environmental, ocean, freshwater and natural resources sustainability, major progress includes:

STI policies, the science-policy interface, and engagement with society including vulnerable groups, were strengthened, in particular through capacity building in 2016 in order for the Bahamas to develop and strengthen implementation of their STI policy. As a reminder, in the previous biennium, Curacao and Guyana had also benefitted from UNESCOs support in the development and implementation of their policy in 2015 .

In addition, preliminary discussions on a proposal for a regional STI policy development project for Tonga, Samoa, Vanuatu, New Caledonia and Kiribati were initiated in 2016. At the regional level, in Latin America and the Caribbean, UNESCO organized the Science Open Forum CILAC 2016, in September in Montevideo, which proposed a policy agenda for STI for governments, universities, scientific companies and civil society organizations, in line with the priorities established in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In West Africa, the capacity of participants from Cabo Verde was enhanced on STI policy development and management during an expert meeting in September 2016 in Dakar. In addition, an activity on innovation and enterprise development and promotion of the Global Strategy for Youth in West Africa Sahel, was organized in June 2016 in Cabo Verde .

In the area of research and education in the basic sciences, human and institutional capacities were enhanced, through synergies among UNESCO network of partner institutions. In that context, in collaboration with the University of Mauritius, a regional conference was implemented in Mauritius (February 2016) aiming at ensuring that basic and applied sciences are accessible to all, through low-cost and easy replicable science experimentation teaching. A follow-up conference will be held in February 2017. Support was brought to Cabo Verde in the organization of the national mathematics Olympiads, and in the implementation of a postgraduate programme in basic sciences for development. Assistance was brought to Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago in the setting-up and extension of the UNESCOs Global Microscience Programme. A microscience model for PALOP countries in Africa, which will benefit Sao Tome and Principe, and Cabo Verde, is being conceived by IBSP in collaboration with the Africa Department. In the promotion of the use and application of renewable energy, reviewing the existing technologies and sharing best practices and experiences on renewable energy technologies and policies in South-East Asia, UNESCO strengthened two regional institutions, namely ASEAN Center and SEASN. The UNESCO African Schools on renewable energy policies and strategies trained participants from Sao Tome and Principe. Through collaboration with the International Centre for Pure and Applied Mathematics (CIMPA), more than 22 research and innovation-oriented schools have been organized, providing training to more than a thousand young scientists, among them 200 in SIDS. During the previous biennium, Cuba benefitted from UNESCOs support to organise the 14th edition of the Carlos Finlay UNESCO prize in Microbiology, the same support will be provided to the country for the 15th edition in 2017 .

UNESCO is in the process of strengthening its STEM programme with the IBSP playing the role of a strategically-oriented platform with an emphasis on teacher training and on Africa and least developed countries, which will benefit to a SIDS on a global level .

In the area of scientific understanding of ocean and coastal processes, IOC has refocused its ocean science programmes with the aim of increasing awareness and mobilizing the scientific capacities of its Member States to address the challenges defined by the SDGs, the Samoa Pathway, the Sendai Framework and the Paris Agreement on Climate. IOC-led Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (330 members from 67 countries), allows Member States to improve the monitoring of Ocean Acidification and supports the observation of its impacts on marine life. The updated GOAON implementation plan, including updated chemical and physical guidelines for OA observations, is still in preparation and will be published in June 2017. It comprises inputs from 67 countries, including Fiji, Palau and Samoa. A Global Oxygen Network (GO2NE) was established to support research with regard to deoxygenation of the ocean, and includes scientists from SIDS. In order to assess the impacts of climate change and global trends of phytoplankton in the ocean, more than 300 time series were analysed, divided into Arctic, North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Antarctic, Indian, South Pacific and North Pacific Oceans, for both phyto- and zooplankton, covering more than five inter-comparable marine ecosystems, including data from SIDS .

201 EX/5 Part I (A) Annex page 3 In the framework of coastal resilience and climate change education, in the AIMS, Caribbean and Pacific SIDS; the capacities of teachers and community groups were enhanced to introduce climate change across formal and informal curricula through UNESCOs course on Climate Change Education Inside and Outside the Classroom. The extension of the Sandwatch project was also ensured through dedicated action in support of the global roll-out of the Global Sandwatch Database as a citizen science climate change coastal monitoring tool .

Risks and impacts of tsunamis and other ocean-related hazards, climate change adaptation and mitigation measures, and policies for healthy ocean ecosystems were at the forefront of the IOCsupported activities of SIDS Member States. For example, IOC engaged 14 Caribbean SIDS in harmonising and standardizing tsunami early warning systems. These countries are also very active at annual CaribeWave Exercises, where monitoring and warning services are tested. The same 14 Caribbean SIDS and four South-West Pacific SIDS have benefitted from regional or in-country trainings to develop or review their Tsunami Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), in Cook Islands, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu. The installation of new sea-level monitoring stations in Aruba, Jamaica and Saint Lucia have contributed to enhanced sea-level monitoring capabilities in the Caribbean, for tsunamis and other coastal hazards. A solution for the continuation of the work of the Caribbean Tsunami Information System was recently found with the help of the Government of Barbados and a voluntary contribution to the IOC Special Account by the Government of the Netherlands .

In the area of the protection and sustainable management of ocean and coastal resources, the GEF LME:LEARN project for generating, learning and sharing knowledge among GEF Large Marine Ecosystem projects and practitioners and related coastal and marine initiatives started with an inception workshop and a first project steering committee, held at UNESCO in March 2016. The project delivered its most visible output, namely, the 18th Annual Large Marine Ecosystem Consultation Meeting in December 2016. The meeting featured a record-setting 128 participants from 52 different countries, including three from SIDS .

The Global Ocean Science Report is envisaged as a knowledge resource that will aid Member States, their local and national governments, academic and research institutions as well as international organizations and donors, in making informed decisions regarding the status of ocean sciences research, investment, and productivity. The drafting process is close to completion. A questionnaire sent to all IOC Member States was answered by 34 Member States, with fewer than 20% from SIDS. The interdisciplinary, international Editorial Board was established and met from 24 to 26 May in Helsingor, Denmark, reviewing five draft chapters and identifying data gaps. The content and outline are aligned with major pillars of sustainable development. A second Editorial Board meeting was hosted by Korea in November 2016 .

Global cooperation in the geological sciences was expanded, in particular, through the promotion of Earth Science education in Latin America in 2016. An open call was issued for experts in this field, resulting in the identification of individuals including from SIDS: Belize, Cuba, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, and Saint Lucia, who will now help in finalizing a questionnaire that will be sent out on this topic across the region. At the first IGCP Council meeting in February 2016, the Council agreed to fund four new and 16 existing projects. In addition, six projects have been extended without funding. Although none of the project leaders are from SIDS, the project participants include Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Papua New Guinea, Singapore, Timor-Leste and Vanuatu. Of 142 project leaders, 25% are women .

SIDS Member States have reduced their vulnerability and enhanced their resilience to natural hazards by strengthening their capacities in DRR, in particular, through the implementation of the UNESCO-VISUS multi-hazard school safety assessment methodology, which helps policy-makers in deciding where to focus their risk reduction efforts and interventions based on available resources and scientific evidence. The methodology is currently under implementation in 100 schools in the north of Haiti. In addition, a ToolKit on Loss and Damage, to help collect baseline data about loss and damage in the agriculture and tourism sectors in selected Pacific SIDS, has been developed. In 201 EX/5 Part I (A) Annex page 4 the future, the ToolKit can be expanded to include other sectors. Awareness-raising was also advanced through events such as the information session for the GRULAC Member States on the VISUS methodology. Capacity-building has been enhanced through training of more than 40 experts from 13 countries in the Caribbean on various technical issues related to DRR for the education sector, including assessment of critical facilities infrastructure .

The UNESCO World Network of Biosphere Reserves (WNBR), a network of sustainable development learning sites, contains 669 Biosphere Reserves (BR), including 16 transboundary sites in 120 countries, 20 biosphere reserves are located in SIDS, including the La Hotte BR in Haiti, which joined the network in 2016 .

One research programme, promoting sustainability science and sustainable development, is being conducted in three SIDS BRs: Macchabee-Bel Ombre in Mauritius, Principe in Sao Tome and Principe and Saint Marys in Saint Kitts and Nevis .

Member States including SIDS have continued to be supported in order to improve groundwater governance at local, national and transboundary levels. Under the Transboundary Waters Assessment Programme (TWAP), 42 SIDS benefitted from specific assessment on groundwater. Moreover, nine SIDS have benefitted from an expansion of the institutional support for drought monitoring systems in Cuba, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Bahamas, Saint Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago, Mauritius and Cabo Verde. In addition, Cuba, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Bahamas, Saint Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago have benefitted from training on water scarcity. Additionally, Saint Lucia was trained on water quality .

In Priority 3 on Supporting SIDS in the management of social transformations and the promotion of social inclusion and social justice:

Progress has been made towards the enhancement of capacities of decision-makers, civil society organizations and other key stakeholders in SIDS to design and implement innovative proposals for the development of public policies in favour of social inclusion and intercultural dialogue. This includes the participation of UNESCO in the work of the interagency Global Migration Group, contributing to meetings of its Principals, conceptual work on principles and frameworks, joint advocacy statements and study papers, and to conferences and round tables on mainstreaming migration in the 2030 Agenda. The Conference on Engaging men and boys in the achievement of gender equality in Latin America and the Caribbean was organized and attended by Cuba and Jamaica. The 2016 International UNESCO/Jos Mart Prize was held on 28 January in Cuba .

UNESCO has been supporting the formulation, review, and implementation of youth-related policies and legislation, with the participation of youth at different levels in Cabo Verde, Cuba, Guinea-Bissau, Timor-Leste, Haiti, and Saint Kitts and Nevis .

Other youth-related activities in SIDS include a schoolrelated gender-based violence (SRGBV) initiative in Samoa, implemented through capacity-building and the development of media programmes by media students. A youth-based research initiative in Tonga, and a network in Cabo Verde, among other countries, were conducted to put into practice the acquired knowledge and skills received during a training on innovation management and entrepreneurship development .

Research on school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV) in the Pacific was promoted to improve policies and raise awareness on gender-based violence in the education system (with the engagement of universities, teachers, principals and ministries). Elaborated jointly with the Institute of Education, University of the South Pacific in Tonga, the terms of reference for the research on schoolrelated gender-based violence focused on a desk review of existing literature on SRGBV in the Pacific and in Tonga and the development of survey tools. The research will be conducted in the major islands of Tongapatu and Vavau encompassing a sample of 250 informants consisting of students, parents and schoolteachers. Besides providing substantive evidence on the situation of SRGBV in Tonga, the research aims to provide policy recommendations to strengthen policies combatting gender-based violence in schools. This initiative represents a concrete contribution of UNESCO to the 201 EX/5 Part I (A) Annex page 5 implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals of the 2030 international development agenda in the Pacific region. Focus will be put on the challenges related to two SDGs: SDG #5 Achieve gender equality and empowerment for all women and girls and SDG #16 Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels .

In the field of physical education, sports and anti-doping, 20 out of 24 countries in the Pacific region still do not have a sport policy. Following a workshop organized by UNESCO in 2015, UNESCO, along with the Organization of Oceanic National Olympic Committees (ONOC), developed the Pacific Sport Compass initiative that was officially endorsed by the fourth meeting of Pacific Ministers of Sport in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, in July 2015. The initiative is currently being successfully implemented in the region .

Through the focus areas of sport policy and education, the Pacific Sport Compass provides a structured process to build the partnership between sport stakeholders and the wider development community to ensure that sport makes an active contribution to the wellbeing of the Pacific peoples and the implementation of SDGs in the region. With some seed funding secured, the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat prepared a funding proposal for the European Union to support the initiative. Fiji is one of the five pilot countries in which the UNESCO Quality Physical Education Guidelines for Policy Makers are being rolled out and tested in cooperation between UNESCO, WHO, the National Olympic Committee, and the Ministry of Education .

In the framework of the implementation of the International Convention against Doping in Sport, in 2016, the Bahamas, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Guyana and Singapore have implemented projects with the support of the Anti-Doping Fund to strengthen national and regional capacities in the fight against doping. Moreover, in November 2016, the Funds Approval Committee approved initiatives submitted by the Bahamas, Fiji and Jamaica, to be implemented in 2017 .

As for Priority 4 on Preserving Tangible and Intangible Cultural Heritage and Promoting Culture for Island Sustainable Development, significant progress has also been made, in particular:

Concerning the implementation of the 1972 Convention, one SIDS ratified the Convention. Four SIDS Parties developed new or revised Tentative Lists, and three SIDS submitted nomination files conforming to prescribed requirements. Eight SIDS applied to World Heritage Fund International Assistance. One SIDS was supported in the integration of the Conventions provisions in national laws or policies. Staff capacity was reinforced in 13 SIDS World Heritage properties, focusing on sustainable tourism in two properties. Two properties in SIDS contributed to sustainable tourism development. One World Heritage marine property in SIDS revised its management plan, and managers from six SIDS World Heritage marine properties exchanged management solutions and best practices. Two partnerships were developed in SIDS for conservation. A survey on the upstream process was launched in early 2017 in order to develop harmonized proposals for its implementation, in particular, to address the needs of SIDS. Finally, youth from 10 Caribbean SIDS were involved in the World Heritage Youth Project on Marine Biodiversity and Climate Change. Several SIDS participated in the meetings of the governing bodies of the Convention .

Under the 1970 Convention, six SIDS were supported in the integration of the Conventions provisions, and eight SIDS benefited from awareness-raising initiatives. Several SIDS participated in the meetings of the governing bodies of the Convention as well as in the Intergovernmental Committee for Promoting the Return of Cultural Property to its Countries of Origin or its Restitution in case of Illicit Appropriation .

Concerning the 2001 Convention, three SIDS ratified it and two SIDS adapted their national law. The Technical Advisory Body dispatched four technical mission, including one to assist Haiti in underwater cultural heritage preservation and management. One assistance project was undertaken in Cuba .

Several SIDS participated in the meetings of the governing bodies of the Convention .

201 EX/5 Part I (A) Annex page 6 With regard to the 2003 Convention, six SIDS were supported in the integration of the Conventions provisions in national laws or policies. Seven SIDS ratified the Convention during the reporting period. Five periodic reports on the implementation of the Convention at the national level were submitted by SIDS State Parties and three were examined by the committee. Moreover, human and institutional resources for intangible cultural heritage were strengthened in 13 SIDS. Several SIDS participated in the meetings of the governing bodies of the Convention .

Under the 2005 Convention, two SIDS ratified the Convention. Five SIDS applied for funding from the International Fund for Cultural Diversity. Three SIDS adopted national policies (Seychelles, Mauritius, Barbados) that promote the diversity of cultural expressions, including cultural goods, services and activities. One SIDS was supported to integrate the Convention into national cultural policy (Samoa). One SIDS submitted its quadrennial report (Cuba). Several SIDS participated in the meetings of the governing bodies of the Convention .

In relation to Priority 5 on Increasing connectivity, information management and knowledge

sharing, the following progress was made:

In April 2016, UNESCO launched an awareness-raising campaign, showing the medias full potential in times of epidemics and crises, specifically to contain the spread of Zika virus in Latin America and the Caribbean. Informative and preventive radio spots, produced by UNESCO in collaboration with IFRC and WHO, were made available online, free of charge, to be downloaded, shared and broadcast by public, private and community radio stations. These radio spots informed their audiences on the risks associated with the virus and promoted healthy behaviors. Following the Zika virus outbreak in Latin America and the Caribbean, UNESCO organized a workshop in Panama City, Panama, to address the issue of cooperation and the relationship between media and humanitarian organizations in disaster and emergency situations .

In the area of community media, the 32 phasing-out radio stations have reinforced their capacities to ensure the sustainability of achieved results during the first phase of the project. At least 800 radio stations have broadcast the radio spots on Zika virus across the region of Latin America and the Caribbean .

   

PRINCIPAUX PROGRS ACCOMPLIS DANS LA PREMIRE PHASE DE MISE EN UVRE

DU PLAN D'ACTION POUR LES PETITS TATS INSULAIRES EN DVELOPPEMENT (PEID)

DANS LE CADRE DU 38 C/5 En ce qui concerne la priorit 1 relative au renforcement des capacits insulaires en vue dun

dveloppement durable par lducation et le renforcement des capacits humaines et institutionnelles, les progrs suivants ont t enregistrs :

Les capacits nationales des PEID ont t renforces pour llaboration et la mise en uvre de politiques et de plans dans le cadre de lapprentissage tout au long de la vie ; en particulier, un examen des politiques a t men Saint-Kitts-et-Nevis et un autre lanc aux Bahamas. Un soutien a galement t apport Hati pour la conception et la mise en uvre dun systme d'information sur la gestion de l'ducation (SIGE). LUNESCO aide les PEID laborer des politiques et des plans directeurs nationaux relatifs aux TIC dans lducation en organisant des ateliers nationaux suivis davis techniques sur la finalisation des politiques ; les Fidji, la Jamaque, Maurice et les Seychelles ont rcemment bnfici de ces soutiens et ont labor leurs politiques et leurs plans directeurs. La politique jamacaine relative aux TIC dans lducation a t approuve par le gouvernement. Avec lappui de lUNESCO, le Gouvernement de la Jamaque a adapt le Cadre de comptences des enseignants en matire de TIC (ICT-CFT) de lOrganisation en 2016 et prvoit de lappliquer dans les tablissements de formation des enseignants du pays .

Les capacits des PEID ont t renforces en vue dlaborer et de mettre en uvre des politiques visant transformer lEFTP. Notamment, Sainte-Lucie a mis en place une nouvelle politique dans ce domaine, inspire dune analyse de sa politique dEFTP mene avec lappui de lUNESCO qui sera publie en fvrier 2017. De plus, par le biais de lUNESCO-UNEVOC, un programme phare dencadrement de lEFTP a t mis en place pour favoriser une meilleure comprhension et une mise en uvre stratgique institutionnelle du Programme de dveloppement durable l'horizon 2030, en particulier de lODD 4, conformment la Stratgie de lUNESCO en faveur de lEFTP (2016-2021). Vingt-deux cadres moyens et suprieurs de lEFTP de 19 pays, notamment la Barbade, les Fidji et la Jamaque, ont t forms. Ce programme a renforc les capacits dencadrement et de gestion des participants. De plus, cinq centres UNEVOC participent la mise en uvre de programmes de renforcement des capacits en faveur des cadres, enseignants et formateurs de lEFTP dans lensemble des trois domaines prioritaires de la Stratgie de lEFTP. Quatre de ces programmes ont t pleinement mis en uvre et 83 enseignants et formateurs ont t forms en AsiePacifique, notamment aux Fidji et Kiribati .

LUNESCO apporte galement un soutien technique en vue de renforcer la formation et le perfectionnement professionnel des enseignants dans les PEID. En particulier, lUNESCO a aid Cuba et la Rpublique dominicaine valuer et revoir leurs normes relatives aux enseignants sur la base de la Stratgie rgionale sur les enseignants de lUNESCO, ce qui a dbouch sur une srie de recommandations lintention des dcideurs ; ces recommandations sont actuellement adaptes au contexte ducatif national des deux pays. De plus, lUNESCO fournit son appui la formation des enseignants aux Fidji, Samoa, dans les les Salomon et Vanuatu, dans le but daccrotre le nombre denseignants dots des qualifications requises pour enseigner. En deux ans, plusieurs ateliers de formation sur les normes professionnelles et les cadres de comptences, ainsi que sur la formation continue des enseignants, ont soutenu le travail des enseignants, des chefs dtablissement et des responsables de lducation .

LUNESCO aide les PEID mettre en uvre le Programme d'action global pour l'EDD comme moyen d'assurer le suivi de la Dcennie des Nations Unies pour l'ducation au service du dveloppement durable : 250 coles du rSEAU de 25 pays, dont trois PEID (Rpublique dominicaine, Cabo Verde et Hati), ont particip llaboration et la mise en uvre de plans daction globaux sur lEDD lcole, ciblant en particulier le changement climatique. LUNESCO a organis une formation internationale de formateurs l'approche globale du changement climatique (21-23 novembre 2016, 201 EX/5 Partie I (A) Annexe page 2 Dakar (Sngal)) pour 40 coordonnateurs de projet et modrateurs scolaires nationaux. Une deuxime formation suivra en mars 2017. Les tablissements de formation des enseignants de Maurice participent un programme de renforcement des capacits en vue dintgrer lEDD dans leur formation initiale et continue au niveau secondaire. Des jeunes de dix PEID ont t choisis pour participer un programme de formation lexercice de responsabilits en matire dEDD. Plusieurs PEID participeront des sances de renforcement des capacits en vue dintgrer lEDD et les ODD lchelle locale .

En ce qui concerne la priorit 2 visant accrotre la rsilience des PEID face la gestion durable de lenvironnement, des ocans, des eaux douces et des ressources naturelles, les

principaux progrs sont les suivants :

Les politiques de STI, linterface science-politiques et lengagement auprs de la socit, y compris les groupes vulnrables, ont t consolids, en particulier grce au renforcement des capacits en 2016 pour permettre aux Bahamas de dvelopper et renforcer la mise en uvre de leur politique en matire de STI .

Pour mmoire, au cours du prcdent exercice biennal, Curaao et le Guyana avaient galement bnfici de laide de lUNESCO pour llaboration et la mise en uvre de leur politique en 2015. De plus, des discussions prliminaires sur une proposition de projet rgional dlaboration dune politique des STI pour les Tonga, Samoa, Vanuatu, la Nouvelle-Caldonie et Kiribati ont t amorces en 2016. Au niveau rgional, en Amrique latine et dans les Carabes, lUNESCO a organis en septembre 2016 le Forum ouvert sur les sciences CILAC, Montevideo, qui a propos un programme stratgique en faveur des STI aux gouvernements, universits, entreprises scientifiques et organisations de la socit civile, conforme aux priorits tablies dans le Programme de dveloppement durable lhorizon 2030. En Afrique occidentale, les capacits des participants de Cabo Verde ont t renforces en matire dlaboration et de gestion des politiques de STI lors dune runion de spcialistes en septembre 2016 Dakar. De plus, une activit sur le thme de linnovation et de la cration et de la promotion dentreprise de la Stratgie mondiale pour la jeunesse en Afrique occidentale Sahel a t organise en juin 2016 Cabo Verde .

Dans le domaine de la recherche et de lenseignement en sciences fondamentales, les capacits humaines et institutionnelles ont t renforces, grce des synergies au sein du rseau dinstitutions partenaires de lUNESCO. cet gard, en collaboration avec lUniversit de Maurice, une confrence rgionale a t organise dans ce pays en fvrier 2016 dans le but de sassurer que les sciences fondamentales et appliques soient accessibles tous, grce un enseignement des sciences par lexprimentation peu coteux et facile reproduire. Une confrence de suivi sera organise en fvrier 2017. Un soutien a t apport Cabo Verde dans lorganisation des olympiades nationales de mathmatiques et dans la mise en uvre dun programme dtudes universitaires en sciences fondamentales au service du dveloppement. Une assistance a t fournie Saint-Kitts-et-Nevis, Sainte-Lucie et Trinit-et-Tobago pour la mise en place et llargissement du programme mondial de microscience de lUNESCO. En collaboration avec le Dpartement Afrique, le PISF labore actuellement un modle microscientifique pour les pays lusophones dAfrique (PALOP), dont bnficieront Sao Tom-et-Principe et Cabo Verde. Concernant la promotion de lutilisation et de lapplication des nergies renouvelables, lexamen des technologies existantes et lchange de bonnes pratiques et dexpriences sur les technologies et politiques en matire dnergies renouvelables en Asie du Sud-Est, lUNESCO a renforc deux institutions rgionales, savoir le Centre de lASEAN et le Rseau pour le dveloppement durable en Asie du Sud-Est (SEASN) .

Les coles africaines de lUNESCO sur les politiques et stratgies en matire dnergies renouvelables ont form des participants de Sao Tom-et-Principe. Grce une collaboration avec le Centre international de mathmatiques pures et appliques (CIMPA), plus de 22 coles axes sur la recherche et linnovation ont t mises en place, qui ont form plus dun millier de jeunes scientifiques, dont 200 originaires des PEID. Au cours de lexercice biennal prcdent, Cuba a bnfici du soutien de lUNESCO pour lorganisation de la 14e dition du prix Carlos J. Finlay en microbiologie ; le pays en bnficiera encore pour la 15e dition en 2017. LUNESCO semploie renforcer son programme pour les STEM, le PISF jouant le rle dune plate-forme stratgique ; laccent mis sur la formation 201 EX/5 Partie I (A) Annexe page 3 des enseignants, sur les pays dAfrique et les pays les moins avancs profitera aux PEID lchelle mondiale .

Dans le domaine de ltude scientifique des processus ocaniques et ctiers, la COI a recentr ses programmes ocanographiques afin de mieux sensibiliser ses tats membres et de mobiliser leurs capacits scientifiques, de faon relever les dfis dfinis dans les ODD, les Orientations de Samoa, le Cadre d'action de Sendai et lAccord de Paris sur les changements climatiques. Le Rseau mondial d'observation de l'acidification de l'ocan (GOA-ON, 330 membres de 67 pays), pilot par la COI, permet aux tats membres de mieux suivre lacidification de locan et favorise lobservation de ses effets sur la vie marine. Son plan de mise en uvre actualis, comprenant des directives chimiques et physiques actualises pour les observations de lacidification de locan, est toujours en prparation et sera publi en juin 2017. Soixante-sept pays y ont contribu, notamment les Fidji, les Palaos et Samoa. Un Rseau de suivi de la concentration en oxygne dans locan mondial (GO2NE) a t cr pour soutenir la recherche sur la dsoxygnation des ocans, et des scientifiques des PEID en font partie. Afin dvaluer les effets du changement climatique et les tendances mondiales du phytoplancton dans locan, plus de 300 sries chronologiques ont t analyses, rparties entre les ocans Arctique, Atlantique Nord, Atlantique Sud, Antarctique, Indien, Pacifique Sud et Pacifique Nord, pour le phytoplancton et le zooplancton, couvrant plus de cinq cosystmes marins comparables et y compris des donnes recueillies dans les PEID .

Dans le cadre de la rsilience ctire et de lducation au changement climatique, dans les PEID couverts par lAIMS, et ceux des Carabes et du Pacifique, les capacits des enseignants et des groupes communautaires ont t renforces pour intgrer le changement climatique dans les programmes denseignement formel et informel par le biais des sessions de formation de lUNESCO sur lducation au changement climatique en classe et l'extrieur de la classe. Llargissement du projet Sandwatch a galement t assur dans le cadre dune action spcifique lappui du dploiement international de la base de donnes mondiales de Sandwatch en tant quoutil scientifique citoyen de suivi des effets du changement climatique sur les rgions ctires .

Les risques et les effets des tsunamis et autres alas lis aux ocans, les mesures dadaptation au changement climatique et dattnuation de ses effets et les politiques en faveur dcosystmes ocaniques sains ont t au premier plan des activits des PEID menes avec le soutien de la COI. Par exemple, la COI a associ 14 PEID des Carabes lharmonisation et la normalisation des systmes dalerte rapide aux tsunamis. De plus, ces pays sont trs actifs lors des exercices annuels CaribeWave, au cours desquels les services de suivi et dalerte sont tests. Ces 14 PEID des Carabes et quatre PEID du Pacifique Sud-Ouest (les Cook, les Salomon, Tonga et Vanuatu) ont bnfici de formations rgionales ou nationales en vue de mettre en place ou de revoir leurs procdures oprationnelles normalises (SOP) relatives aux tsunamis. Linstallation de nouvelles stations de surveillance Aruba, en Jamaque et Sainte-Lucie ont contribu renforcer les capacits de surveillance du niveau de la mer dans les Carabes, en ce qui concerne les tsunamis et autres risques ctiers. Une solution a t rcemment trouve pour poursuivre le travail men par le Systme d'alerte aux tsunamis dans les Carabes, avec laide du Gouvernement de la Barbade et une contribution volontaire du Gouvernement des Pays-Bas au Compte spcial de la COI .

Dans le domaine de la protection et de la gestion durable des ressources ocaniques et ctires, le projet LME/LEARN du FEM destin produire, changer et partager des connaissances entre les projets et praticiens des grands cosystmes marins du FEM et les initiatives ctires et marines connexes a dbut par un atelier de lancement et la premire runion de son Comit directeur, organise lUNESCO en mars 2016. Le projet a abouti son rsultat le plus visible, savoir la runion de la 18e Consultation annuelle sur les grands cosystmes marins, en dcembre 2016 .

Cette rencontre a rassembl un nombre record de 128 participants originaires de 52 pays, dont trois PEID .

Le Rapport mondial sur les sciences ocaniques est envisag comme une source de connaissances qui aidera les tats membres, les gouvernements nationaux et locaux, les instituts universitaires et 201 EX/5 Partie I (A) Annexe page 4 de recherche, ainsi que les organisations internationales et les donateurs, prendre des dcisions claires concernant la situation de la recherche, de linvestissement et de la productivit dans le domaine des sciences ocaniques .

Le processus de rdaction touche sa fin. Un questionnaire a t envoy tous les tats membres de la COI et 34 dentre eux y ont rpondu, dont moins de 20 % taient issus de PEID. Le Comit de rdaction interdisciplinaire et international a t constitu et sest runi du 24 au 26 mai Elseneur (Danemark) ; il a pass en revue cinq chapitres du projet et point les donnes qui y faisaient dfaut. Son contenu et ses grandes lignes sont en accord avec les principaux piliers du dveloppement durable. Une deuxime runion du Comit de rdaction a t organise par la Core en novembre 2016 .

La coopration mondiale en sciences gologiques sest largie, en particulier par la promotion de lducation aux sciences de la Terre en Amrique latine en 2016. Un appel candidatures a t lanc en vue de trouver des spcialistes en la matire, et plusieurs candidats ont t retenus, y compris dans des PEID (Belize, Cuba, Jamaque, Saint-Kitts-et-Nevis et Sainte-Lucie) ; ils vont aider finaliser un questionnaire sur ce thme qui sera envoy dans toute la rgion. sa premire runion en fvrier 2016, le Conseil du PICG est convenu de financer 4 nouveaux projets et 16 projets existants. De plus, 6 projets ont t reconduits sans financement. Si aucun des responsables de projet nest originaire des PEID, les participants aux projets incluent Cuba, la Rpublique dominicaine, la Jamaque, la Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guine, Singapour, le Timor-Leste et Vanuatu ; 25 % des 142 responsables de projet sont des femmes .

Les petits tats membres insulaires en dveloppement ont rduit leur vulnrabilit et amlior leur rsilience face aux risques naturels en renforant leurs capacits en matire de rduction des risques de catastrophe, en particulier grce la mise en uvre de la mthode dvaluation multirisques UNESCO-VISUS pour la scurit des coles, qui aide les dcideurs choisir sur quoi axer leurs efforts et leurs interventions de rduction des risques, compte tenu des ressources et lments scientifiques disponibles. Cette mthode est actuellement mise en place dans 100 coles dans le nord dHati. De plus, une bote outils sur les pertes et dommages a t mise au point ; elle vise rassembler des donnes de rfrence sur les pertes et dommages subies par les secteurs de lagriculture et du tourisme dans un certain nombre de PEID du Pacifique. lavenir, cette bote outils pourra tre largie dautres secteurs. La sensibilisation a galement progress grce des manifestations telles que la session dinformation sur la mthode VISUS destine aux tats membres du GRULAC. Les capacits ont t renforces par la formation de plus de 40 spcialistes de 13 pays des Carabes diverses problmatiques techniques relatives la rduction des risques de catastrophe pour le secteur de lducation, notamment lvaluation des infrastructures essentielles .

Le Rseau mondial des rserves de biosphre (WNBR) de lUNESCO, un rseau de sites dapprentissage du dveloppement durable, compte 669 rserves de biosphre, dont 16 sites transfrontires, dans 120 pays ; 20 rserves de biosphre se situent dans des PEID, dont celle de La Hotte en Hati, qui a rejoint le Rseau en 2016 .

Un programme de recherche visant promouvoir la science de la durabilit et le dveloppement durable est actuellement men dans trois rserves de biosphre situes dans des PEID : Macchabe-Bel Ombre Maurice, Principe Sao Tom-et-Principe et Sainte-Marie Saint-Kitts-et-Nevis .

Les tats membres, notamment les PEID, continuent de bnficier dune aide pour amliorer la gouvernance des eaux souterraines lchelle locale, nationale et transnationale. Dans le cadre du Programme d'valuation des eaux transfrontalires (TWAP), 42 PEID ont bnfici dune valuation spcifique des eaux souterraines. En outre, neuf PEID (Cuba, Hati, Rpublique dominicaine, Jamaque, Bahamas, Sainte-Lucie, Trinit-et-Tobago, Maurice et Cabo Verde) bnficient dun largissement du soutien institutionnel aux systmes de suivi des scheresses. Par ailleurs, Cuba, Hati, la Rpublique dominicaine, la Jamaque, les Bahamas, Sainte-Lucie et Trinit-et-Tobago ont reu une formation sur les pnuries deau. De plus, Sainte-Lucie a bnfici dune formation sur la qualit de leau .

201 EX/5 Partie I (A) Annexe page 5 En ce qui concerne la priorit 3 visant aider les PEID grer les transformations sociales

et promouvoir linclusion et la justice sociales :

Des progrs ont t accomplis dans le renforcement des capacits des dcideurs, des organisations de la socit civile et dautres acteurs majeurs dans les PEID en vue de concevoir et de mettre en uvre des propositions novatrices pour llaboration de politiques publiques en faveur de linclusion sociale et du dialogue interculturel. Cela passe par la participation de lUNESCO aux travaux du Groupe mondial interinstitutions sur la migration, la contribution aux runions de ses responsables, un travail conceptuel sur les principes et les cadres, des dclarations conjointes de plaidoyer et des rapport dtudes, et la prsence des confrences et des tables rondes sur lintgration de la migration dans le Programme 2030. La Confrence intitule Associer les hommes et les garons la ralisation de lgalit des genres en Amrique latine et dans les Carabes a t organise par Cuba et la Jamaque et a accueilli des participants de ces deux pays. La crmonie de remise du Prix international Jos Mart 2016 de lUNESCO a t organise le 28 janvier Cuba .

LUNESCO soutient la formulation, la rvision et la mise en uvre de politiques et de lgislations axes sur la jeunesse, avec la participation des jeunes diffrents niveaux, Cabo Verde, Cuba, en Guine-Bissau, au Timor-Leste, en Hati et Saint-Kitts-et-Nevis. Dautres activits relatives la jeunesse sont menes dans les PEID, notamment une initiative sur les violences lies au genre en milieu scolaire Samoa, mise en uvre grce au renforcement des capacits et llaboration de programmes mdiatiques par des tudiants en journalisme. Un projet de recherche ax sur la jeunesse aux Tonga et un rseau Cabo Verde, entre autres pays, a t men pour mettre en pratique les connaissances et les comptences acquises loccasion dune formation sur la gestion de linnovation et le dveloppement de lentrepreneuriat .

La recherche sur les violences lies au genre en milieu scolaire dans le Pacifique a fait lobjet dune campagne de promotion en vue damliorer les politiques et de sensibiliser davantage aux violences lies au genre dans le systme ducatif (avec la participation duniversits, denseignants, de chefs dtablissement et de ministres). labor conjointement avec lInstitut de lducation de lUniversit du Pacifique Sud aux Tonga, le mandat dun projet de recherche portait sur une tude de la documentation existante dans le domaine des violences lies au genre en milieu scolaire dans le Pacifique et aux Tonga et sur llaboration dinstruments denqute. Le projet men dans les les principales de Tongapatu et Vavau sappuiera sur un chantillon de 250 informateurs constitu dtudiants, de parents et denseignants. En plus dapporter des lments concrets sur la situation des violences lies au genre en milieu scolaire aux Tonga, ces recherches devraient dboucher sur des recommandations stratgiques en vue de renforcer les politiques de lutte contre ces violences. Elles reprsentent une contribution concrte de lUNESCO la mise en uvre des objectifs du Programme de dveloppement durable lhorizon 2030 dans la rgion Pacifique. Laccent sera mis sur les dfis lis deux ODD : lODD 5 : Parvenir lgalit des sexes et autonomiser toutes les femmes et les filles et lODD 16 : Promouvoir lavnement de socits pacifiques et inclusives aux fins du dveloppement durable, assurer laccs de tous la justice et mettre en place, tous les niveaux, des institutions efficaces, responsables et ouvertes tous .

Dans le domaine de lducation physique, des sports et de la lutte contre le dopage, 20 pays de la rgion Pacifique sur 24 ne disposent toujours pas dune politique du sport. la suite dun atelier quelle a organis en 2015, lUNESCO a conu avec lOrganisation des comits nationaux olympiques d'Ocanie linitiative du Pacifique en faveur du sport, Pacific Sport Compass, officiellement approuve par la 4e runion des Ministres du sport du Pacifique Port Moresby (Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guine), en juillet 2015. Cette initiative est actuellement mise en uvre avec succs dans la rgion .

Par les domaines cibles de la politique sportive et de lenseignement du sport, cette initiative offre un processus structur pour nouer un partenariat entre les acteurs du sport et la communaut du dveloppement dans son ensemble, pour faire en sorte que le sport contribue activement au bientre des peuples du Pacifique et la mise en uvre des ODD dans la rgion. Grce une petite 201 EX/5 Partie I (A) Annexe page 6 rserve de fonds damorage, le Secrtariat du Forum des les du Pacifique a labor une proposition de financement lintention de lUnion europenne pour soutenir linitiative. Les Fidji font partie des cinq pays pilotes o les directives de lUNESCO l'intention des dcideurs en matire dducation physique de qualit sont dployes et exprimentes dans le cadre dune coopration entre lUNESCO, lOMS, le Comit national olympique et le Ministre de lducation .

En 2016, dans le cadre de lapplication de la Convention internationale contre le dopage dans le sport, les Bahamas, la Barbade, Cuba, la Grenade, le Guyana et Singapour ont mis en uvre des projets avec laide du Fonds anti-dopage en vue de renforcer les capacits nationales et rgionales en matire de lutte contre le dopage. En outre, en novembre 2016, le Comit d'approbation du Fonds a approuv des initiatives soumises par les Bahamas, les Fidji et la Jamaque, en vue dune mise en uvre en 2017 .

En ce qui concerne la priorit 4 visant prserver le patrimoine culturel matriel et immatriel

et promouvoir la culture pour favoriser le dveloppement durable des les, des progrs importants ont galement t accomplis, notamment :

Sagissant de la mise en uvre de la Convention de 1972, un PEID la ratifie. Quatre PEID parties la Convention ont constitu ou rvis des listes indicatives et trois ont prsent des dossiers de candidature rpondant aux exigences requises. Huit PEID ont demand lassistance internationale du Fonds du patrimoine mondial. Un PEID a bnfici dun appui pour la transposition des dispositions de la Convention dans les lois et les politiques nationales. Les effectifs ont t renforcs dans 13 sites du patrimoine mondial localiss dans des PEID, le tourisme durable tant particulirement cibls dans deux de ces sites. Deux sites situs dans des PEID ont contribu lessor du tourisme durable. Un site du patrimoine mondial marin localis dans un PEID a rvis son plan de gestion, et des solutions et des bonnes pratiques ont t changs par des gestionnaires de 6 sites du patrimoine mondial marin localiss dans un PEID. Deux partenariats de conservation ont t mis en place dans des PEID. Une tude sur le processus en amont a t lance dbut 2017 en vue dlaborer des propositions harmonises pour sa mise en uvre, en particulier pour rpondre aux besoins de PEID. Enfin, des jeunes de 10 PEID des Carabes ont particip au Projet des jeunes du patrimoine mondial sur la biodiversit marine et le changement climatique . Plusieurs PEID ont particip aux runions des organes directeurs de la Convention .

Sagissant de la Convention de 1970, 6 PEID ont t soutenus dans la transposition de ses dispositions et 8 ont bnfici de campagnes de sensibilisation. Plusieurs PEID ont particip aux runions des organes directeurs de la Convention ainsi quau Comit intergouvernemental pour la promotion du retour de biens culturels leur pays dorigine ou de leur restitution en cas dappropriation illgale .

Sagissant de la Convention de 2001, un PEID la ratifie et transpose dans son droit national. Le Conseil consultatif scientifique et technique a envoy une mission scientifique pour assister Hati dans la prservation et la gestion du patrimoine culturel subaquatique. Un projet dassistance a t men Cuba. Plusieurs PEID ont particip aux runions des organes directeurs de la Convention .

Sagissant de la Convention de 2003, 6 PEID ont bnfici dun soutien dans la transposition des dispositions de la Convention dans les lois et les politiques nationales. Sept PEID ont ratifi la Convention pendant la priode considre. Cinq rapports priodiques sur la mise en uvre de la Convention au niveau national ont t prsents aux PEID parties la Convention et 3 ont t examins par le Comit. En outre, les ressources humaines et institutionnelles destines au patrimoine culturel immatriel ont t renforces dans 13 PEID. Plusieurs PEID ont particip aux runions des organes directeurs de la Convention .

   

pour la transposition de la Convention dans la politique culturelle nationale. Un PEID (Cuba) a prsent son rapport quadriennal. Plusieurs PEID ont particip aux runions des organes directeurs de la Convention .

En ce qui concerne la priorit 5 visant amliorer la connectivit, la gestion de linformation

et le partage des connaissances, les progrs suivants ont t accomplis :

En avril 2016, lUNESCO a lanc une campagne de sensibilisation dont lobjectif tait de montrer tout le potentiel des mdias dans les priodes dpidmies et de crises, en particulier pour contenir la propagation du virus Zika en Amrique latine et dans les Carabes. Des messages radiophoniques dinformation et de prvention produits par lUNESCO en collaboration avec lIFRC et lOMS ont t mis en ligne pour tre tlchargs, partags et diffuss gratuitement par des stations de radio publiques, prives et communautaires. Ces messages taient destins informer le public sur les risques associs au virus et promouvoir des comportements prophylactiques. Suite lpidmie du virus Zika en Amrique latine et dans les Carabes, lUNESCO a organis un atelier Panama (Rpublique du Panama) sur le thme de la coopration et des relations entre les mdias et les organisations humanitaires dans les situations de catastrophe et durgence .

Dans le domaine des mdias communautaires, 32 stations de radio menaces de disparition ont renforc leurs capacits pour assurer la prennit des rsultats obtenus pendant la premire phase du projet. Au moins 800 stations ont diffus les messages radiophoniques sur le virus Zika dans lensemble de la rgion Amrique latine et Carabes .

Des acteurs locaux dans les tats membres ont encourag le dveloppement des mdias dans le cadre du Programme international pour le dveloppement de la communication (PIDC). La 60e runion du Bureau du PIDC sest tenue les 17 et 18 mars 2016. Sur la centaine de propositions de projets reues, 59 rpondaient aux critres de qualit dfinis par le PIDC et ont t prsentes au Bureau pour examen. Cinquante et un projets ont finalement t retenus dans 46 pays, pour un

montant total de 721 000 dollars des tats-Unis. Les projets approuvs se rpartissent comme suit :

17 en Afrique, 5 dans la rgion des tats arabes, 17 dans la rgion Asie-Pacifique, 11 dans la rgion Amrique latine et Carabes et 1 projet de porte internationale. En ce qui concerne les PEID en particulier, un montant total de 96 000 dollars des tats-Unis titre de soutien aux projets a t approuv pour les pays suivants : Samoa, Timor-Leste, Maldives, Rpublique dominicaine, Cuba, Jamaque, Vanuatu, Nouvelle-Caldonie, les Solomon et Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guine. Cela reprsente 39 000 dollars de plus que la somme prvue de 60 000 dollars des tats-Unis .

   

5 ,

   

B .

38 C/21 200 EX/5.I.C .

2018-2021 . ( 39 /5) .

   

B. ( 197 EX/45, 38 C/21 200 EX/5.I.C) <

   

38 C/21 200- -21 .

200 EX/5 Part I.C. .

200 EX/5 Part I.C, 200- :

2 .

(a) , (b) -22 (c) 201- , 200- ( .

200 EX/5.I.C). ( λ) .

2016 . II .

(-22) 3 .

() 2016 . , , 7 18 2016 .

-22 -21 . -22 , , 2018 .1. -22 201 EX/5 Part I (C) 22- (-22) 201 EX/5 Part I (D) -21 -22 .

4 .

, : (a) 2 1,5, , , ; (b) , , , ; (c) .

, , 5 .

-/CMA.1 , .

http://unfccc.int/files/meetings/marrakech_nov_2016/application/pdf/auv_cma1_matters_relating_to_the_implementation_of_the_paris_agreement.pdf 201 EX/5 Partie I (B) page 2 (). , . -22 , . .

, , : (a) ; (b) ; () , .

III .

2015 . 7 .

() (JIU/REP/2015/5) , , , 2 .

. 1: , , , 2020 . 2: , , ( 21) .

2 .

10. 1 () 2016 . (. 1), , 2030 .3. .

   

1. A .

B. , 2030 .

C. D. E. - F .

, G. , H. ( VI CEB/2016/4)

IV .

11. 200 EX/5 Part I.C. , . 200- , -22, () , , 39 C/5 .

39 C/5 , , , 39 C/5 201- .

12. - , , , (-21) () 2030 . 13 .

13. 39 C/5 , . :

201 EX/5 Partie I (B) page 4 - (a) (), 13 37 C/4 39 C/5;

, b) , ;

c) , ;

, (d) , ;

(e) .

14. 2014-2021 . ( 37 /4) :

- A .

- B .

C .

, D .

,

15. , , , . , , , LINKS .

   

, 197 EX/45, 38 C/21 200 EX/5.I.C, 1 .

2 .

, 201 EX/5 Part I (B), 3 .

-22;

5 .

;

39- ;

2, () , (JIU/REP/2015/5), () (CEB/2016/4);

- - , ();

- , ;

   

II. General Principles and Criteria for UNESCOs Actions III. Thematic Action Focus Areas A. Supporting Member States to develop and implement climate change education and public awareness programmes and policies B. Promoting interdisciplinary climate knowledge and scientific cooperation for climate change mitigation and adaptation C. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural heritage safeguarding for climate change mitigation and adaptation D. Supporting inclusive social development, fostering intercultural dialogue and promoting ethical and gender mainstreaming principles in relation to climate change mitigation and adaptation IV. Climate Change and UNESCO Global Priorities and priority target groups

   

IV.4 Youth actors in understanding and addressing climate change V. Implementation modalities VI. Budgetary provisions VII. Communication and outreach VIII. Monitoring and evaluation Table: Schematic overview of the UNESCO Strategy for Action on Climate Change (2018-2021) Introduction 201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annex page 2

1. Climate action is essential for transformative sustainable development. It is also a major opportunity to leverage desirable social transformations that will favour social inclusion and justice as well as safeguard the climatic and ecological systems on which we depend. It is high time to redirect our technology, science, finance and ingenuity to transform our economies, ensure equality and promote a sustainable future for all, including young people, women, and indigenous and ethnic minorities. This requires leadership from governments, international organizations, the private sector and civil society, as well as the active involvement of the most affected groups .

2. The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) stresses that human influence on the climate system is clear, recent anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases are the highest in history and recent climate changes have had widespread impacts on human and natural systems.4

3. In 2015, the international community reached a historic Agreement on climate change in Paris, during the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP 21) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). That same year governments adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development together with 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs), among which SDG 13 calls on Member States to take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts .

4. The Paris Agreement, which entered into force on 4 November 2016,5 constitutes a major breakthrough under the UNFCCC. It aims to strengthen the global response to the threat of climate change, in the context of sustainable development and efforts to eradicate poverty, including by: (a) Holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels, recognizing that this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change; (b) Increasing the ability to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change and foster climate resilience and low greenhouse gas emissions development, in a manner that does not threaten food production; (c) Making finance flows consistent with a pathway towards low greenhouse gas emissions and climate.6

5. Under the Paris Agreement, each Party shall prepare, communicate and maintain successive Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) that it seeks to achieve. Parties shall pursue domestic mitigation measures with the aim of achieving the objectives of such contributions. This implies a bottom-up approach to holding the global average temperature increase and to augmenting adaptation abilities. The Parties to the Agreement shall periodically take stock of its implementation to assess the collective progress towards achieving its purpose and long-term goals. The first such global stocktake should take place in 2023 and thereafter every 5 years. UNFCCC COP 22 (7-18 November 2016, Marrakech, Morocco) made important progress towards the operationalization of the Paris Agreement.7 The IPCC will prepare a special report on the Impacts of Global Warming of 1.5C above Pre-Industrial Levels and Related Global Greenhouse Gas Emission Pathways to be delivered in 2018, in time for a facilitative dialogue among Parties to take preliminary stock of progress under the Agreement.8

6. The UNESCO General Conference at its 38th session invited the Director-General to present http://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/index.shtml As of 20 January 2017, 126 Parties have ratified of 197 Parties to the UNFCCC .

http://unfccc.int/paris_agreement/items/9444.php The decision to adopt the Paris Agreement (Decision 1/CP.21) contained in document FCCC/CP/2015/L.9/Rev.1

together with the authentic text of the Paris Agreement are available in the six official UN languages from pages:

http://unfccc.int/documentation/documents/advanced_search/items/6911.php?priref=600008831and http://unfccc.int/paris_agreement/items/9444.php Decision -/CMA.1 Matters relating to the implementation of the Paris Agreement. http://unfccc.int/files/meetings/marrakech_nov_2016/application/pdf/auv_cma1_matters_relating_to_the_implementation_of_the_paris_agreement.pdf For information on the report, see: http://www.ipcc.ch/report/sr15/. The facilitative dialogue is referred to in para 20 in Decision 1/CP.21 Adoption of the Paris Agreement (FCCC/CP/2015/10/Add.1) .

http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2015/cop21/eng/10a01.pdf 201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annex page 3 to the UNESCO Executive Board at its 200th session a proposal for an updated UNESCO Strategy for Action on Climate Change taking into due consideration the outcomes of COP 21 (38 C/Resolution 21, Contribution by UNESCO to combating climate change). Accordingly, the Director-General presented in document 200 EX/5 Part I.C. a proposal for an updated UNESCO Strategy for Action on Climate Change to the Executive Board at its 200th session. While appreciating the proposal, the Executive Board invited the Director-General to present to it at its 201st session a final draft integrating the results of COP 22 and the discussion at its 200th session (ref 200 EX/Decision 5.I.C) .

UNESCO STRATEGY FOR ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE (2018-2021)

7. Under the motto Changing Minds, Not the Climate, UNESCOs contributions to rethinking sustainability globally include a wide range of actions under our mandate reflecting the multifaceted nature of climate challenges and associated mitigation and adaptation solutions. With the purpose of providing Member States with climate-related knowledge, data and information services and policy advice to enable a shift in mindsets towards enhanced sustainability, UNESCOs climate change actions are to be developed and implemented through its different Sectors, field offices, designated sites, category 1 and 2 centres, UNESCO Chairs and Networks, and undertaken in close synergy with the overall United Nations system .

I. OBJECTIVE

8. Recognizing that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change, the objective of the UNESCO Strategy for Action on Climate Change (hereinafter the UNESCO Strategy) is to enable Member States to take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts through education, sciences, culture and information and communication, in line with their respective National Determined Contributions (NDCs) under the COP21 Paris Agreement, and in the overall context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its SDG 13 .

9. Targeting a wide range of stakeholders, including decision- and policy-makers, regions and communities, the private sector, academia, NGOs, youth and individuals, UNESCO will achieve this objective by harnessing its expertise in its fields of competence and built upon its experience and

lessons learnt along the following three-pronged approach:

(1) Knowledge (co-)production, openness and dissemination;

(2) Provision of climate services9;

(3) Policy advice .

II. GENERAL PRINCIPLES AND CRITERIA FOR UNESCOS ACTIONS

10. This Strategy is to be implemented through actions and activities outlined in the UNESCO document 39 C/5 that satisfy a set of general principles and criteria. Specifically, such actions and

activities should:

(a) Meet the needs of Member States in relation to their efforts to realize their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) under the Paris Agreement, as well as SDG 13 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in the overall context of documents 37 C/4 and 39 C/5;

(b) Draw on, support and be consistent with relevant existing UNESCO programme and The notion of climate services refers here to data and information compiled and presented in a way that responds to present expressed and anticipated future needs of stakeholders in relation to their efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change .

201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annex page 4

   

(c) Raise awareness on climate change as a cross-sectoral and interdisciplinary issue in an overall sustainable development context while building on the strength and focus of each Major Programme of UNESCO;

(d) Focus on activities that can be scaled-up in order to ensure a seamless, coherent and structured combination of regular and extrabudgetary sources;

(e) Ensure synergies with the overall United Nations system based on a set of Common Core Principles for a United Nations System-wide Approach to Climate Action .

III. THEMATIC ACTION FOCUS AREAS

11. Consistent with the UNESCO's Medium-Term Strategy for 2014-2021 (document 37 C/4), UNESCO actions on climate change shall target the thematic focus areas A D below. Within these thematic focus areas, priority shall be given to actions contributing to Gender Equality, Africa, SIDS and the engagement of youth (see also section IV). All actions should also, as appropriate, be consistent with and supportive of relevant action plans, policies and agreements developed by or endorsed by UNESCO, such as the UNESCO SIDS Action Plan, the UNESCO Policy on Engaging with Indigenous Peoples and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction .

A. Supporting Member States to develop and implement climate change education and public awareness programmes and policies

12. Education and awareness-raising enable informed decision-making, play an essential role in increasing climate change adaptation and mitigation capacities of communities, and empower women and men to adopt sustainable lifestyles. Climate change education is part of UNESCOs Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) programme. In 2014 UNESCO launched the Global Action Programme (GAP) on ESD, the official follow-up to the United Nations Decade of ESD, with climate change as a critical thematic focus .

13. Through the UN Alliance on Climate Change Education, Training and Public Awareness, UNESCO will continue to support and guide countries to meet commitments under the Paris Agreement and UNFCCC Article 6 on education. UNESCO will support schools, including UNESCO Associated schools (ASPnet) and training institutions to implement climate change education through a whole-school approach. Dedicated teaching and learning resources, such as Climate Change in the classroom: UNESCO course for secondary teachers on climate change education for sustainable development and many other climate change education resources will continue to be made freely available on UNESCOs Clearinghouse on ESD .

14. UNESCO will foster cross-sectoral approaches that connect Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) with the other SDGs in order to support Member States in achieving a smooth transition to green and digitized economies, and more broadly towards sustainable development. The Organization will adopt new guidelines on green skills development, aimed at enabling Member States to leverage the process of transition towards a greener, low-carbon economy, create decent jobs on a large-scale and promote social inclusions. In line with the Global Action Programme on Education for Sustainable Development, UNESCOs work on institutional and professional capacity development will support Member States in green TVET by adopting a whole-of-institution approach to transformation, which entails the capacity building of leaders, education managers and teachers with the aim of supporting them to implement systemic reforms for embedding sustainability concepts in TVET. Implement this strand of work, the UNESCO-UNEVOC International Centre will develop appropriate guidelines and include training courses within its TVET leadership programme .

   

change, UNESCO will enhance public awareness of climate change, and of what countries and communities can do to adapt. This also aids reporting on what governments and companies do, or do not do, to respond to these threats. Full use will be made for this purpose of the publication Climate Change in Africa: A Guidebook for Journalists, which has already being deployed in training at COP 21 in Paris and COP 22 in Marrakech .

16. The UNESCO massive open online course (mooc) on Climate Justice: Lessons from the Global South will also help enhance public awareness .

17. More broadly, freedom of expression, access and openness of information and knowledge, ICTs, free public, private and community media, online and offline, have a catalyzing role for the achievement of enhanced climate action .

18. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, UNESCO plans to supports Member States in their efforts to provide learners, throughout life, with the knowledge, skills, values, attitudes and behaviors needed to promote sustainable development and engage with the world as responsible global citizens. This will be achieved by assisting countries in integrating sustainable development, including climate change, into education policies, curricula, teacher education and student assessment. (MPI, ER6)

19. Furthermore, UNESCO plans to support capacities of independent media (MP V, ER 3), innovative use of ICTs for sustainable development (MP V, ER 4) and capacities of Member States in fostering knowledge societies for sustainable development, including in relation to climate change, through the implementation of the World Summit on the Information Society (MP V, ER 6), B. Promoting interdisciplinary climate knowledge and scientific cooperation for climate change mitigation and adaptation

20. UNESCO will promote continuous strengthening of the interdisciplinary climate change knowledge base, including through generation and use of sound and unbiased data information and early warning in order to improve the resilience of Member States to climate change through national and local climate mitigation, adaptation and risk management policies, in conformity with their respective NDCs. This will be achieved through sustainability science actions in support of climate change research, assessments and monitoring including through collaboration among UNESCO capacities in natural and social sciences, local and indigenous knowledge, ecological and socio-cultural systems, culture, education, and communication and information .

21. Through its International Hydrological Programme (IHP), International Geoscience Programme (IGCP), Man and the Biosphere (MAB) Programme,, Management of Social Transformations Programme (MOST), Local and Indigenous Knowledge Systems Programme (LINKS),the Communication and Information Sector and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC), UNESCO will provide, and support the provision of data and climate information services notably on water security, earth sciences, biodiversity and the ocean .

B1. Ocean and climate

22. The IOC of UNESCO facilitates the development of ocean sciences, observations and capacity-building to monitor the oceans critical role in the climate system and predict ocean changes .

Laying the ground for efficient adaptation and mitigation strategies, IOC focuses on the most damaging impacts, e.g. ocean acidification and temperature increase, sea-level rise, deoxygenation, variations in storminess and changes in marine biodiversity. IOCs scientifically- founded services help countries, in particular coastal and small island developing states become more resilient to climate change .

23. IOC will remain at the forefront of new research priorities on climate change impacts on the ocean, climate change mitigation through the conservation and restoration of coastal and marine ecosystems such as mangroves and salt marshes the so-called blue carbon and the overall 201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annex page 6 contribution of the ocean to achieving the SDGs on conserving the ocean and combatting climate change .

24. Through the international Ocean and Climate Platform, IOC will help the oceanographic community inform UNFCCC-related debates on the vital interaction between climate and ocean .

25. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, UNESCO through IOC plans to support science-informed policies for increased resilience and adaptation to climate change, developed and implemented by Member States through institutional and technical capacity development assistance. It also envisages to assist in enhancing knowledge of emerging issues related to climate change and the ocean, particularly in relation to ocean processes required for adaptation to climate change, standards and methodologies to observe ocean acidification and blue carbon ecosystems, and enhanced understanding of marine ecosystem functioning and the impacts of change and variability on ecosystem services (IOC, ER1) .

B2. Water and climate

26. Climate change will reduce freshwater resources and lead to intensified competition for them .

UNESCOs International Hydrological Programme (IHP) will promote scientific cooperation and citizen science to assess and monitor changes in water resources and raise awareness and capacities of policy-makers on related risks and measures to prepare for such risks. IHP will also provide hydroclimatic services through the development and implementation of tools and methodologies in water-stressed and vulnerable regions to identify adaptation responses and reduce the impact of droughts and floods, support the development of web and mobile applications to monitor precipitation and glaciers. IHP will also advance sustainable groundwater management, considering climate change and linked human effects. The International Initiative on Water Quality (IIWQ) will facilitate scientific and policy discussions on climate change impacts on water quality of the worlds water resources. IHP will also promote the sustainable management of water resources in human settlements and coordinate with the Megacities Alliance for Water and Climate. IHP through its worldwide network of demonstration sites for ecohydrology, will promote the use of natural existing processes as tools for an improved management of water-related ecosystems at different scales. IHP will encourage sustainability and foster peace through promoting water diplomacy in the management of transboundary water resources. UNESCO World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP) will coordinate the production of the UN World Water Development Report, which assesses the state of the worlds freshwater resources and provides tools to promote its sustainable use .

27. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, UNESCO plans to support Member States to strengthen their responses and resilience to climate change related water security challenges at local, national and regional levels towards achievement of water-related SDGs and targets (MP II, ER 4) .

B3. Biodiversity and climate

28. Biodiversity will be negatively impacted by climate change, while playing an important role for climate change mitigation, adaptation and resilience. UNESCOs Man and the Biosphere (MAB) Programme will spearhead interdisciplinary work on ecosystem services, and conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity such as in forests, that are of great importance for the global climate .

Combining natural and social sciences, economics and education with a view to improving human livelihoods and safeguarding natural and managed ecosystems, MAB will contribute to climate change mitigation and adaptation by promoting integrated, multidisciplinary, participatory approaches within and among biosphere reserves .

   

30. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, UNESCO will support Member States to strengthen their management of natural resources towards achievement of MAB-related SDGs and targets on biodiversity and climate change resilience, (MP II, ER 6) as well as to develop the use of BR and/or UNESCO Global Geoparks as a comprehensive network of observatories for resilience to climate change and natural hazards, making use of citizen science (MP II, ER 7) .

B4. Disaster risk reduction

31. The links between climate change and disaster risk reduction points to the need to increase the resilience of communities to climate change and extreme weather phenomena through systematic planning and capacity development, including through gender responsive components .

UNESCO will assist Member States to provide a platform for enhancing cooperation in knowledgesharing, policy advice and education for disaster preparedness and mitigation and supporting the further development of risk reduction networks hazard warning systems (such as storm-surges, storms, floods, landslides and droughts). UNESCOs actions in this area shall be supportive of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction .

32. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, in addition to work targeting MP II ER 4 and IOC ER 1 (see above), UNESCO will support Member States to strengthen their management of both geological resources and geohazards risk towards achievement of related SDGs and targets, including SDG 13 (MP II, ER 5) .

B5. Science, technology and innovation

33. As key drivers for sustainable development, science, technology and innovation are pivotal for addressing climate change mitigation and adaptation. UNESCO will support Member States in creating the enabling environment for comprehensive STI systems, policies and institutional and human capacity development in STI and engineering relevant to climate change action. UNESCOs programmes will, in short, be designed as delivery platforms for several international conventions, including the UNFCCC, its Paris Agreement and SDG 13 .

34. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, UNESCO, with its Category 2 Centres, UNESCO Chairs, IBSP and its partners, will collaborate with Member States to increase institutional and human capacities in the sciences and engineering, including in the area of climate change (MP II, ER 2) .

B6. Social and human sciences

35. Responding to climate change entails significant social transformations that need to be understood and supported through the social and human sciences within the broader framework of sustainability science. The MOST programme will engage Member States in developing socially inclusive responses to climate challenges, as well as working closely with research stakeholders, on the basis of interdisciplinarity, to develop the concepts and methods appropriate to dealing with the Anthropocene .

36. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, and consistently with the MOST strategy, UNESCO will collaborate with Member States to enhance research and policy capacities on the social and human dimensions of climate change and to support inclusive adaptation policies sensitive to specific national contexts (MP III ERs 1 & 2) .

B7. Local and indigenous knowledge

37. The importance of indigenous knowledge in climate change action, particularly adaptation is embedded in the Paris Agreement. As the key United Nations actor in this domain, UNESCO, in-line with the UNESCO Policy on Engaging with Indigenous Peoples, will continue long-standing cooperation with indigenous peoples and relevant bodies, including UNFCCC, IPCC and WMO on good practices and methodologies bringing indigenous knowledge into assessment and policy .

201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annex page 8

38. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, UNESCO will reinforce global recognition and mobilization of local and indigenous knowledge to respond to environmental change, expanded partnerships with the United Nations system and key intergovernmental processes on climate change with a focus on climate vulnerable regions such as sub-Saharan Africa, SIDS and the Arctic (MP II, ER 3) .

B8. Information and communication technologies

39. In all the above, UNESCO will promote universal access to, and preservation of, information and knowledge, including through ICTs. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, UNESCO will promote open and inclusive solutions and innovative use of ICTs for sustainable development, including in relation to access to scientific knowledge (A2SK) and climate change (MP V, ER 4) .

C. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural heritage safeguarding for climate change mitigation and adaptation

40. UNESCO recognizes and promotes the importance of cultural knowledge and diversity, with cultural heritage and diversity as crucial drivers for the societal transformation and resilience needed in order to respond to climate change and promote sustainable development .

41. UNESCO will continue to provide support to States Parties to its Conventions in the field of culture, especially those that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of Climate Change, in strengthening their capacities to safeguard their heritage, both natural and cultural (tangible and intangible), and in implementing preventive and corrective measures to combat Climate Change impacts on their heritage, including through raising awareness, sharing of information, good practices, experiences and lessons learned, and developing pilot projects towards Climate Change mitigation, adaptation and resilience building .

42. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, UNESCO plans to support Member States to mainstream sustainable development policy, including climate change, in the conservation and management of World Heritage properties under the 1972 Convention, (MP IV, ER 1), and in policies and programmes aimed at integrating the safeguarding of cultural heritage in emergency contexts, including for preparedness and recovery (MP IV, ER 5). UNESCO will also support Member States to integrate culture into their plans, policies and programmes contributing to the achievement of SDGs (MP IV, ER 8) .

D. Supporting inclusive social development, fostering intercultural dialogue and promoting ethical and gender equality principles in relation to climate change mitigation and adaptation

43. The social and human sciences significantly enhance our understanding of contemporary challenges, including climate change, and help us to respond to them more effectively. UNESCO will support inclusive and sustainable development, foster intercultural dialogue and help Member States to embed human rights, gender equality and ethics in the social, scientific and technological developments that are transforming todays increasingly complex and diverse societies, such as in relation to climate change. Through a focus on policy advice and capacity-building UNESCO will make a direct contribution to support Member States in the their efforts under the Paris Agreement and SDG 13, with particular emphasis on climate change adaptation and a major contribution from ethics, building on the preparation of a draft declaration of ethical principles in relation to climate change and the decade-long work of the World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology on this topic .

201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annex page 9

44. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, UNESCO will support strengthened public climate related policy-making in Member States through scientific evidence, humanities-based knowledge, ethics, and human rights frameworks (MP III, ER 1), and Increased institutional and human capacities at all levels to generate, manage and apply climate change relevant knowledge for development that is inclusive, equitable, and based on ethical values and human rights (MP III, ER 2). In relation to gender equality, UNESCO will mainstream gender equality considerations throughout its climate change actions and ensure equal participation of women and men in the decision-making processes, thus ensuring that the perspectives of both women and men are incorporated in the solutions to the various challenges of advancing sustainable and equitable development .

IV. CLIMATE CHANGE AND UNESCO GLOBAL PRIORITIES AND PRIORITY TARGET

GROUPS IV.1 Global Priority Gender Equality

45. As stated already in 2001 by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), climate change impacts will be differently distributed among different regions, generations, age, classes, income groups, occupations and genders (IPCC, 2001). Gender-specific issues at stake include: (i) women are affected differently and more severely by climate change and its impact on agriculture, natural disasters, climate-change induced migrations because of social roles, discrimination and poverty; (ii) women are largely underrepresented in decision-making processes regarding climate change, greenhouse gas emissions and adaptation/mitigation; and (iii) there are significant gender biases in carbon emissions and hence carbon footprints due to womens and mens economic production and consumption patterns .

46. As women suffer disproportionately from poverty, they will also suffer most when erratic weather brings droughts or floods to marginal lands or crowded urban areas where poverty is most felt. While existing evidence underscores the vulnerability of women to climate change, there is also a wealth of evidence which underlines that women play an important role in supporting households and communities to mitigate the effects and adapt to climate change. Women are most of the worlds farmers, household resource managers and caregivers; and women have led and continue to lead

many of the most innovative responses to environmental challenges. At the local level, women provide particular kinds of social capital for mitigation, adaptation and coping with environmental change, actively organizing themselves during and after disasters to help their household and community .

47. Women are also in the best position to influence changes in behaviour for better disaster risk management as well as participate in and manage post-disaster efforts. Women are also able to map risks and vulnerabilities from their own standpoint and to play an important role in creating and monitoring early warning systems. Womens knowledge in adaptation (traditional and community specific) is an important resource in education for sustainable development. As effective agents of change in relation to climate change mitigation and adaptation, and education for sustainable development, enhancing womens capacities to address climate change is a critical area of action .

Womens access to resources as well as their involvement in decisions and the development of policies related to climate change is of utmost importance both to identify their specific needs and priorities but also to make full use of their knowledge and expertise, including traditional practices .

48. Men and women have different access to public awareness information, including early warning systems. These societal and cultural issues must be an integral part of providing truly universal access to information, especially with a view to enhancing gender equality in this vital area .

49. UNESCO will therefore work to raise awareness of gender specificities in adaptation and mitigation to climate change, including through the collection and use of sex-disaggregated data, mapping of gender-specific emissions profiles, and differences in mitigation and adaptive capacities and strategies .

201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annex page 10

50. As already mentioned under Thematic Focus Area D above, UNESCO will ensure gender equality considerations are mainstreamed throughout the implementation of the UNESCO Strategy for Action on Climate Change, including equal participation of women and men in the decision-making processes .

51. Based on the information in the Global Ocean Science Report, to be published in 2017, a sexdisaggregated distribution of researchers in different fields of ocean science will be provided by IOC, including marine science with the focus of climate change. These data will serve as a baseline for biennial performance indicators and targets for the next quadrennial period .

52. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, UNESCO will promote gender-responsive policies related to climate change and will ensure systematic and comprehensive contribution to Gender Equality and womens empowerment through its work on climate change (Global Priority Gender Equality, ER 1) .

UNESCO will also promote the increase in the participation of women in decision-making processes regarding climate change, greenhouse gas emissions and adaptation/mitigation .

IV. 2 Climate Change and Global Priority Africa

53. Recognizing that climate change could endanger future well-being of the population, ecosystems and socio-economic progress of Africa and cognizant of the vulnerability of African economic and production systems to climate change and climate variability and the continents low mitigation and response capacities, UNESCO shall aim to improve education, outreach and the policy dimension of addressing climate change in African countries, in addition to its direct contribution to the regional knowledge base. Particular attention shall be paid to the development of science and technology and related policies, as stated in the UNESCO contribution to the African Union Science and Technology Consolidated Plan of Action .

54. To assist with adaptation strategies along the coast of West Africa, the continuing IOC Integrated Coastal Area Management Project will incorporate a human dimensions component. This is an example of what shall become common practice: incorporating social and policy aspects into all ongoing climate-related science projects in the region .

55. The IOC will further develop the capacities of its Member States in Africa by brokering innovation and learning, facilitating the transfer of marine technology and providing science-informed policy advice for the implementation of integrated ocean governance and management .

56. In the area of water UNESCOs International Hydrological Programme (IHP) is implementing projects related to knowledge generation and capacity-building for water management under climate stress in all regions of Africa. IHP is also studying the impacts of global changes on river basins and groundwater resources with a focus on transboundary aquifers and groundwater systems, enhancing resilience to climate disasters (flood and drought) and urban water needs. This includes the first ever multi-disciplinary assessment of groundwater resources in 199 transboundary aquifers and the development and implementation of an experimental drought monitor project for Africa that provides near real-time monitoring of land surface hydrological conditions, based on modelling supported by remote sensing to improve capacity-building and adaptation to climate change .

57. African biosphere reserves, particularly in Central Africa and the Congo Basin, will be promoted as sites for pilot projects for reduced emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD+), thus addressing climate change mitigation .

   

shared by States (MP II, ER 4). Special attention will be paid to establish joint initiatives among indigenous and scientific knowledge holders to co-produce knowledge to meet the challenges of global climate change (MP II, ER 3). UNESCO and its global priority Africa will also, promote hydrographical or hydrogeological basins or cooperation frameworks, cross-border initiatives for biosphere reserves, World Heritage sites and UNESCO Global Geoparks supported by consultation and coordination within an appropriate cooperation and management framework workshops to build capacity and mutual respect and understanding between indigenous and scientific knowledge holders, in particular climate change specialists (MP II, ER 4) .

IV.3 Climate Change in the UNESCO SIDS Action Plan

59. With an increasingly changing global environment, due in particular to climate change, impacts are showing to be particularly devastating for small island developing states (SIDS), due to their continuing reliance upon natural resources for food security, health, shelter and livelihoods. This was the case in 2015 in Vanuatu after the Cyclone Pam, or more recently after the Cyclone Winston, which hit Fiji in February 2016. The consequences of this global environmental change (coastal inundations from sea level rise, droughts, extreme climatic events, expanding urban or industrial development, establishment of protected areas), exacerbate competition for already scarce resources, such as food, water and accessible land, leading to conflicting contexts at a local level. This is what makes SIDS challenges very specific and puts them in an extremely vulnerable situation .

60. These specific concerns of the SIDS were reiterated by the international community at the Third International Conference on SIDS (Apia, Samoa, September 2014), in the 2030 Agenda, as well as at the UNFCCC COP21. The outcomes of these events shaped the development of the UNESCO long-term SIDS Action Plan approved by the UNESCO Executive Board at its 199th session in 2016 .

61. The dedicated UNESCO SIDS Action Plan proposes a set of objectives and follow-up actions to address the unique vulnerabilities and challenges faced by SIDS. It represents UNESCOs engagement in the implementation of the SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action [S.A.M.O.A.] Pathway, while reflecting the 2030 Agenda including the corresponding SDGs and their specific targets, as well as the UNFCCC COP21 Paris Agreement outcomes. Indeed, the Action Plan echoes many articles of the SAMOA Pathway, including Climate Change (paragraphs 31-46), and reflects most of the SDGs and some of their specific targets such as SDG 13 .

62. The focus of the Action Plan consists of five priority areas and aims at reinforcing SIDS human and institutional capacities via education and capacity-building; enhancing the resilience and sustainability of SIDS ecosystems; promoting social transformation, inclusion and justice; preserving tangible/intangible cultural and natural heritage, promoting culture for sustainable development; as well as increasing connectivity, information management and knowledge sharing in SIDS. It mobilizes UNESCOs multidisciplinary expertise from all its programme sectors to address the unique vulnerabilities and challenges faced by SIDS, including climate change. Through the Action Plan, UNESCO will collaborate with SIDS countries and communities to ensure the sustainable management of terrestrial and marine natural resources and heritage at the regional, national and local levels; the adaptation of individuals, communities and states to climate and environmental change and natural hazards; as well as strengthen SIDS preparedness and response to natural disaster events and population related consequences .

63. One of the actions proposed to reduce island vulnerability and enhance resilience in the face of global environmental change, is the Sandwatch project. Through its broad-based participatory and integrated citizen-science MAST (Measure/Monitor, Analyse, Share, Take Action) approach, Sandwatch helps communities and policy-makers anticipate threats and co-design potential adaptive solutions to reinforce their resilience and contribute to global assessment process .

64. IHP will support the development of data-driven freshwater assessment tools in SIDS regions 201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annex page 12 for both surface and groundwater systems. IHP will continue to provide hydroclimatic services, monitoring and early warning tools for droughts and floods, and to conduct multi-disciplinary assessment of groundwater, currently developed in 42 small islands. IHP will strengthen SIDS water education and awareness at all levels, through trainings of scientists, water professionals and decision makers as well as the provision of a platform for the exchange of information among regional and global networks, to improve water resources management in SIDS considering projected impacts of climate change on water resources .

65. IOCs engagement in support of SIDS will be guided by the IOC SIDS Action Plan and Strategy adopted by IOC Member States in June 2016 in response to the SAMOA Pathway, with particular emphasis on the building of SIDS actions related to coastal hazard early warning systems, the development of marine scientific and technological capacity of SIDS, and enhanced cooperation to assess ocean acidification impacts .

66. The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 highlights international, regional, sub-regional and transboundary cooperation and calls for a broad and more people-centred preventive approach to disaster risk. It specifies seven global targets, among which is the need to substantially increase assistance to developing countries to complement their national action and ensure access to multi-hazard warning systems and disaster risk information and assessment by

2030. The IOCs hazard warning system was developed in complete accordance with the Sendai Framework and is highly relevant in the context of SIDS and low-lying coastal countries .

67. In the context of the draft 39 C/5, UNESCO will reinforce environmental monitoring and resilience, including through citizen science and science education. as measured by programmes to strengthen community-based monitoring of environmental change, including climate change (MP II, ER 3) .

IV.4 Youth actors in understanding and addressing climate change

68. Climate change impacts a wide range of sectors that affect the lives of all populations, particularly those of young women and men. The environmental, social and economic consequences of climate change impact youth access to safe and adequate water and food, as well as to education, good health, housing, work and an overall standard of living. Climate change also exacerbates poverty and enhances migration, leading to challenges related to the social inclusion of young migrants .

69. Youth embody the present and the future of the planet. There are currently 1.8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and 24 in the world. This is the largest youth population ever, and in many countries young women and men constitute the majority of the population. These young people are also the most educated, with strong social and environmental awareness and the power to transform societies towards a climate resilient future. As such, youth should play a major role in both understanding and addressing climate change .

70. In line with the UNESCO Operational Strategy on Youth (2014-2021), the role of youth in leading change, by mobilizing their energy and ideas to address climate change, will be particularly emphasized. UNESCO will mobilize its youth networks, including young men and women scientists, to promote mitigation and adaptation to climate change by encouraging their engagement as knowledge holders, innovators and leaders in policy processes, as well as in education and public awareness campaigns. Building capacities of youth to become todays and tomorrows drivers of green economies, green growth and sustainable development will be a particular priority. Such action will not only tackle climate change in the long term, but will also respond to major concerns regarding youth employability and livelihoods, and will enhance their recognition and inclusion as key actors in the development of our societies .

   

challenges (MP III, ER 3) .

V. IMPLEMENTATION MODALITIES

72. The Strategy will be implemented both through actions undertaken by UNESCO Major Programmes, as well as through intersectoral and inter-programme cooperation involving UNESCO Headquarters and field offices facilitated by the intersectoral UNESCO Task Team on Climate Change. Full use will be made of the UNESCO designated sites (i.e. biosphere reserves, UNESCO Global Geoparks and World Heritage sites) for this purpose .

A. International and Intergovernmental UNESCO Programmes, IOC and their Networks and Partners:

73. The international and intergovernmental science programmes (MAB, IHP, IGCP, IBSP, LINKS and MOST) and IOC will be fully engaged in the implementation of the Strategy, including through dedicated joint activities. Through these programmes, UNESCO will also mobilize the global academic community for common climate change actions .

B. Collaboration with United Nations bodies, including the UNFCCC, and COP host countries

74. The Strategy shall be implemented in synergy with United Nations partner organizations, while avoiding overlaps, consistent with the established common core principles for a United Nations system-wide approach for climate action (see Box 1).UNESCO shall also further build on partnership opportunities with the UNFCCC Secretariat on actions of mutual interest for the implementation of the Strategy .

Box 1. Common Core Principles for a United Nations System-Wide Approach to Climate Change Action* A. Support and advance inclusive sustainable development for all in line with common UN norms and standards B. Facilitate integrated climate action that maximizes synergies and co-benefits across the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development C. Advance and scale-up ambitious and transformative action on climate change D. Prioritize interagency collaboration and joint action for greater collective impact E. Strengthen United Nations system responsiveness to Member States needs on climate change F. Base United Nations system climate action on the best climate science, data and knowledge G. Build and strengthen partnerships, including with non-state actors H. Ensure United Nations system-wide accountability on climate action * Contained in Annex VI in the Report of the High-Level Committee on Programmes (HLCP) of the United Nations System Chief Executives Board for Coordination (CEB) at its Thirty-First session (document CEB/2016/4) .

http://www.unsceb.org/CEBPublicFiles/Common%20Core%20Principles%20for%20a%20UN%20Systemwide%20Approach%20to%20Climate%20Action-ODS_0.pdf

75. Following its initial success in relation to COP 20, COP 21, and COP 22, UNESCO, through the UNESCO for COP Partnership Initiative (U4C), will continue to cooperate with COP host countries for the mobilization and engagement of the scientific, educational, media, and private sector 201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annex page 14 communities, as well as the public at large, for enhanced climate change awareness and action in the lead-up to, during and in the follow-up to UNFCCC COPs .

C. UNESCO designated sites (World Heritage, Biosphere reserves, UNESCO Global Geoparks)

76. The iconic value of UNESCO-designated World Heritage properties, Biosphere reserves and UNESCO Global Geoparks means they serve as a very useful platform for the implementation of the Strategy by facilitating the sharing of information on applied and tested monitoring, mitigation and adaptation processes, and by raising awareness on the impacts of climate change on human societies and cultural diversity, biodiversity and ecosystem services, and the worlds natural and cultural heritage. Spread across different regions, climates and ecosystems around the world, UNESCO designated sites serve as global field observatories for climate change, where information on the impacts of climate change can be gathered and disseminated. Studies are currently being conducted at several sites, and the results are used to plan tailored adaptation and mitigation measures. This includes, where additional funding can be raised, the promotion of sustainable applications of renewable energy technologies, energy efficiency and sharing of related best practices, in conformity with the various standard-setting instruments .

77. UNESCO supports its Member States, as the sovereign custodians of their sites, in these efforts including in building their capacity to design sustainable development options, responding to the new conservation challenges posed by climate change, developing innovative policy, tailoring management strategies, and recognizing the value of resilient communities and of protected area systems that help safeguard the global environment and human societies from the threats posed by climate change .

78. Finally, by effectively linking efforts under the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda, and by creating synergies among them and other UNESCO Conventions in the field of Culture, UNESCO designated sites provide the Organization with a significant comparative advantage in the overall United Nations family .

D. UNESCO Centres and Chairs

79. The full range of relevant UNESCO category 1 and 2 centres and UNESCO Chairs will be encouraged to engage in the implementation of the Strategy .

E. UNESCO National Commissions

80. Ultimately, the success of the Strategy will depend on the effective mobilization of actors and stakeholders at the national levels. This implies that UNESCO National Commissions and national committees linked to UNESCO intergovernmental programmes, as well as Permanent Delegations to UNESCO, have an important role to play, including through the design and execution of projects financed under the UNESCO participation programme, in the implementation of the Strategy .

F. Cities and regional authorities

81. By 2030, over a billion people will live in approximately 100 very large cities and 60 % of the worlds population will live in urban areas. It is projected that population growth in the coming decades will be higher in urban centres, and especially in Africa. City and regional authorities are increasingly pioneering innovative climate change and sustainability initiatives. UNESCO will subsequently establish or reinforce mechanisms under the Strategy for effective partnerships with such authorities. One such example is the Megacities Alliance for Water and Climate Change .

G. NGOs, Youth and ASPnet

   

and schools on issues of common interest linked to actions promoting the implementation of the UNESCO Strategy .

H. Private sector

83. In view of the crucial, pivotal role of the private sector for addressing contemporary and future climate change and sustainable development challenges, UNESCO will seek to establish or maintain solid partnerships with relevant private sector partners and branch organizations esteemed for their climate change and sustainable development credentials in industry, business and finance .

I. Intersectoral UNESCO Task Team on Climate Change

84. Established by the Director-General, the UNESCO Task Team on Climate Change is charged with facilitating intersectoral cooperation and coordination related to the implementation of the UNESCO Strategy for Action on Climate Change, and related monitoring. The Task Team, lead by ADG/SC, is supported by two co-chairs (in SC/MAB and in SHS). The Task Team also ensures coordination, coherence and synergies with the overall United Nations system in relation to climate change, including the UNFCCC and the IPCC and contributes to resource mobilization efforts to scale up UNESCO climate actions .

VI. BUDGETARY PROVISIONS

85. Financial resources needed for the implementation of the Strategy will be estimated and included in document 39 C/5. It is expected that the effective implementation of the updated Strategy will depend to a significant degree on the availability of extrabudgetary resources. Cognizant of this fact, the Strategy endorses as a guiding principle a focus on activities that can be scaled-up in order to ensure a seamless, coherent and structured combination of regular and extrabudgetary sources .

Enhanced efforts for enlarging the donor base and establishing new strategic partnerships will be made. This includes ongoing efforts to renew the Organizations accreditation to the Adaptation Fund and accreditation to the Green Climate Fund. In view of the fact that many developing countries among the Member States, especially those most vulnerable, will require substantial financial support to carry out mitigation and adaptation efforts, UNESCO will also seek to act as an honest broker assisting Member States in their efforts to secure financing, such as under the Adaptation Fund10 and the Green Climate Fund.11

VII. COMMUNICATION AND OUTREACH

86. Actions undertaken to implement the Strategy shall include communication and outreach components. These shall be fully consistent with the Strategys mission statement Changing Minds, Not the Climate and its objective. UNESCOs web and social media facilities shall be mobilized in support of the Strategy. This will include the preparation of a set of core messages and graphical resources to be made available to interested Member States and implementation partners. A special brochure for the general public on UNESCOs climate change actions will be prepared and regularly updated .

VIII. MONITORING AND EVALUATION

87. The implementation of this Strategy will be monitored and reported through the statutory periodic reports to the governing bodies. Evaluation of the Strategy implementation will be undertaken in collaboration with the UNESCO Internal Oversight Service (IOS) .

In relation to the Adaptation Fund (AF), UNESCO will adhere to the operational policies and guidelines of the Adaptation Fund (https://www.adaptation-fund.org/apply-funding/policies-guidelines/) .

In relation to the Green Climate Fund (GCF), UNESCO will adhere to the GCF Accreditation Policies and Standards (http://www.greenclimate.fund/partners/accredited-entities/get-accredited) .

201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annex page 16 Table: Schematic Overview of the UNESCO Strategy for Action on Climate Change (2018-2021) Objective To enable Member States to take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts through education, sciences, culture and information and communication, in line with their respective National Determined Contributions (NDCs) under the COP21 Paris Agreement, and in the overall context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its SDG 13

   

II. Principes et critres gnraux rgissant les actions de lUNESCO III. Ples thmatiques daction prioritaire A. Aider les tats membres laborer et mettre en uvre des programmes et des politiques dducation et de sensibilisation du public au changement climatique B. Promouvoir la coopration interdisciplinaire sur les connaissances et la recherche scientifique relatives au climat aux fins de ladaptation au changement climatique et de lattnuation de ses effets C. Promouvoir la diversit culturelle et la sauvegarde du patrimoine culturel aux fins de ladaptation au changement climatique et de lattnuation de ses effets D. Soutenir un dveloppement social inclusif, favoriser le dialogue interculturel et promouvoir des principes de prise en compte systmatique de lthique et de lgalit des genres en ce qui concerne ladaptation au changement climatique et lattnuation de ses effets IV. Le changement climatique au sein des priorits globales et des groupes cibles prioritaires de lUNESCO IV.1 Priorit globale galit des genres IV.2 Changement climatique et priorit globale Afrique IV.3 Le changement climatique dans le plan daction de lUNESCO pour les PEID IV.4 La jeunesse un acteur part entire pour comprendre le changement climatique et y faire face V. Modalits de mise en uvre VI. Enveloppe budgtaire VII. Communication et sensibilisation VIII. valuation et suivi Tableau : Aperu schmatique de la Stratgie de lUNESCO pour faire face au changement climatique (2018-2021) 201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annexe page 2 Introduction

1. Agir en faveur du climat est essentiel pour parvenir un dveloppement durable et transformateur. Cest aussi une excellente occasion de tirer parti de mutations sociales souhaitables qui favoriseront linclusion et la justice sociale tout en sauvegardant les systmes climatiques et cologiques dont nous dpendons. Il est grand temps de rorienter nos technologies, nos sciences, nos finances et notre ingniosit pour transformer nos conomies, garantir lgalit et favoriser un avenir durable pour tous, notamment les jeunes, les femmes et les minorits ethniques et autochtones. Il faut pour cela que les gouvernements, les organisations internationales, le secteur priv et la socit civile montrent la voie suivre et que les groupes les plus touchs simpliquent activement .

2. Dans son cinquime Rapport dvaluation, le Groupe dexperts intergouvernemental sur lvolution du climat (GIEC) des Nations Unies souligne que linfluence de lhomme sur le climat est clairement tablie, que les missions anthropiques de gaz effet de serre sont les plus leves jamais observes et que les changements climatiques rcents ont eu de vastes rpercussions sur les systmes humains et naturels12 .

3. En 2015, la communaut internationale est parvenue un accord historique sur le changement climatique Paris, lors de la 21e Confrence des Parties (COP-21) la Convention-cadre des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques (CCNUCC). La mme anne, les gouvernements ont adopt le Programme de dveloppement durable lhorizon 2030, ainsi que 17 Objectifs de dveloppement durable (ODD), dont lODD 13, qui appelle les tats membres prendre durgence des mesures pour lutter contre les changements climatiques et leurs rpercussions .

4. LAccord de Paris, entr en vigueur le 4 novembre 201613, reprsente une avance majeure dans le cadre de la CCNUCC. Il vise renforcer la riposte mondiale la menace des changements climatiques, dans le contexte du dveloppement durable et de la lutte contre la pauvret, notamment en : (a) contenant llvation de la temprature moyenne de la plante nettement en dessous de 2 C par rapport aux niveaux prindustriels, et en poursuivant laction mene pour limiter llvation de la temprature 1,5 C par rapport aux niveaux prindustriels, tant entendu que cela rduirait sensiblement les risques et les effets du changement climatique ; (b) renforant les capacits dadaptation aux effets nfastes du changement climatique et en promouvant la rsilience ces changements et un dveloppement faible mission de gaz effet de serre, dune manire qui ne menace pas la production alimentaire ; (c) rendant les flux financiers compatibles avec un profil dvolution vers un dveloppement faible mission de gaz effet de serre et rsilient au changement climatique14 .

5. Aux termes de lAccord de Paris, chaque Partie tablit, communique et actualise les contributions dtermines au niveau national successives quelle prvoit de raliser. Les Parties prennent des mesures internes pour lattnuation en vue de raliser les objectifs desdites contributions. Cela implique une approche ascendante des efforts pour contenir laugmentation moyenne de la temprature du globe et renforcer les capacits dadaptation. Les Parties lAccord font priodiquement le bilan de sa mise en uvre afin dvaluer les progrs collectifs accomplis dans la ralisation de son objet et de ses buts long terme. Le premier bilan mondial devrait tre effectu en 2023 et tous les cinq ans par la suite. La 22e Confrence des Parties (COP-22) de la CCNUCC (7-18 novembre 2016, Marrakech, Maroc) a ralis dimportantes avances en vue de la mise en uvre de lAccord

   

de Paris15. Le GIEC tablira un rapport spcial sur les consquences dun rchauffement plantaire suprieur 1,5 C par rapport aux niveaux prindustriels et les profils connexes dvolution des missions mondiales de gaz effet de serre, qui doit tre publi en 2018, ce qui permettra lorganisation dun dialogue de facilitation entre les Parties en vue dun bilan prliminaire des progrs accomplis au titre de lAccord de Paris16 .

La Confrence gnrale de lUNESCO, sa 38e session, a invit la Directrice gnrale soumettre au Conseil excutif, sa 200e session, une proposition dactualisation de la Stratgie de lUNESCO pour faire face au changement climatique, compte dment tenu des conclusions de la COP-21 (rsolution 38 C/21, Contribution de lUNESCO la lutte contre le changement climatique) .

En consquence, la Directrice gnrale a soumis au Conseil excutif, dans le document 200 EX/5 Partie I (C), une proposition dactualisation de la Stratgie de lUNESCO pour faire face au changement climatique. Tout en accueillant la proposition avec satisfaction, le Conseil excutif a invit la Directrice gnrale lui prsenter, sa 201e session, un projet final refltant les rsultats de la COP-22 et tenant compte des discussions qui ont eu lieu sa 200e session (rf : dcision 200 EX/5.I.C) .

STRATGIE DE LUNESCO POUR FAIRE FACE AU CHANGEMENT CLIMATIQUE (2018-2021)

7. Sous le slogan Changeons les esprits, pas le climat , les contributions de lUNESCO visant repenser la durabilit lchelle mondiale comprennent un large ventail dactions relevant de son mandat, qui refltent le caractre multidimensionnel des dfis lis au climat et des solutions dattnuations et dadaptation correspondantes. Dans le but de mettre la disposition des tats membres les connaissances, les donnes et les services dinformation relatifs au climat qui permettront de faire voluer les mentalits en faveur dune durabilit accrue, les actions entreprises par lUNESCO pour faire face au changement climatique seront labores et mises en uvre par lintermdiaire de ses diffrents secteurs, de ses bureaux hors Sige, des sites dsigns par elle, de ses centres de catgories 1 et 2 et de ses chaires et rseaux, et seront menes en troite synergie avec lensemble du systme des Nations Unies .

I. OBJECTIF

8. tant entendu que la Convention-cadre des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques est le principal mcanisme international intergouvernemental de ngociation de laction mener lchelle mondiale en la matire, lobjectif de la Stratgie de lUNESCO pour faire face au changement climatique (ci-aprs nomme la Stratgie de lUNESCO ) est de permettre aux tats membres de prendre des mesures durgence pour lutter contre le changement climatique et ses effets par lducation, les sciences, la culture, et linformation et la communication, conformment leurs contributions dtermines au niveau national respectives dans le cadre de lAccord de Paris adopt par la COP-21 ainsi que dans le contexte gnral du Programme de dveloppement durable lhorizon 2030 et de lODD 13 qui y est dfini .

9. En ciblant un large ventail de parties prenantes parmi lesquelles les dcideurs et les responsables de llaboration des politiques, les rgions et les communauts, le secteur priv, les milieux universitaires, les ONG, les jeunes et les simples citoyens lUNESCO atteindra cet objectif

en mettant profit son expertise dans ses domaines de comptence et en sappuyant sur les enseignements de son exprience selon une approche comprenant les trois volets suivants :

Dcision -/CMA.1 Questions se rapportant la mise en uvre de lAccord de Paris. http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2016/cma1/fre/l03f.pdf Pour plus dinformations concernant ce rapport, voir : http://www.ipcc.ch/report/sr15/. Le dialogue de facilitation est voqu au paragraphe 20 de la Dcision 1/CP.21 Adoption de lAccord de Paris (FCCC/CP/2015/10/Add.1) .

http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2015/cop21/fre/10a01f.pdf 201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annexe page 4

1. Production (ou coproduction) et diffusion de connaissances dans un esprit douverture ;

2. Prestation de services relatifs au climat17 ;

3. Conseils stratgiques .

II. PRINCIPES ET CRITRES GNRAUX RGISSANT LACTION DE LUNESCO

10. La prsente Stratgie sera mise en uvre travers les actions et activits dcrites dans le document 39 C/5 de lUNESCO qui satisferont un ensemble de principes et de critres gnraux .

Ces actions et activits devront en particulier :

(a) rpondre aux besoins des tats membres pour la ralisation des objectifs de leurs contributions dtermines au niveau national en vertu de lAccord de Paris et de lODD 13 du Programme de dveloppement durable lhorizon 2030, dans le cadre gnral des documents 37 C/4 et 39 C/5 ;

(b) mettre profit les stratgies et plans daction programmatiques et prioritaires de lUNESCO en la matire, les appuyer et tre compatibles avec eux ;

(c) faire prendre conscience du caractre intersectoriel et interdisciplinaire du changement climatique en tant quenjeu sinscrivant dans le cadre global du dveloppement durable, tout en sappuyant sur les points forts et les priorits de chacun des grands programmes de lOrganisation ;

(d) privilgier les activits susceptibles dtre dveloppes plus grande chelle, de faon assurer une combinaison homogne, cohrente et structure de ressources ordinaires et extrabudgtaires ;

(e) mnager des synergies avec lensemble du systme des Nations Unies, fondes sur un ensemble de principes fondamentaux communs, pour une approche lchelle des Nations Unies en matire daction climatique .

III. PLES THMATIQUES DACTION PRIORITAIRE

11. Conformment la Stratgie moyen terme de lUNESCO pour 2014-2021 (document 37 C/4), les actions menes par lOrganisation pour faire face au changement climatique cibleront les ples thmatiques numrs ci-aprs. Au sein de chacun dentre eux, la priorit sera accorde aux actions en faveur de lgalit des genres, de lAfrique, des PEID et de la participation de la jeunesse (voir galement la section IV). Toutes les actions menes devront aussi tre dment conformes et adaptes aux plans daction, aux politiques et aux accords pertinents labors ou entrins par lUNESCO, comme par exemple le Plan daction de lUNESCO pour les PEID, sa politique dengagement auprs des populations autochtones, ou encore le Cadre daction de Sendai pour la rduction des risques de catastrophe .

A. Aider les tats membres laborer et mettre en uvre des programmes et des politiques dducation et de sensibilisation du public au changement climatique

12. Lducation et la sensibilisation permettent la prise de dcisions claires, jouent un rle essentiel dans le renforcement des capacits des communauts en matire dadaptation au changement climatique et dattnuation de ses effets, et donnent aux femmes et aux hommes les moyens dadopter des modes de vie durables. Lducation au changement climatique fait

   

partie du programme ducation en vue du dveloppement durable (EDD) de lUNESCO. En 2014, lUNESCO a lanc le Programme daction global pour lEDD, qui assure officiellement le suivi de la Dcennie des Nations Unies pour lEDD, au sein duquel le ple thmatique du changement climatique occupe une place centrale .

13. Dans le cadre de lAlliance des Nations Unies pour lducation, la formation et la sensibilisation du public aux changements climatiques, lUNESCO continuera de soutenir et dorienter les pays pour les aider respecter les engagements quils ont pris au titre de lAccord de Paris et de larticle 6 de la CCNUCC sur lducation. LUNESCO aidera les coles, y compris les coles associes de lUNESCO (rSEAU) et les instituts de formation, la mise en uvre de

lducation au changement climatique au moyen dune approche lchelle de lcole. Des ressources pdagogiques ddies, telles que le cours en ligne intitul Change in the classroom:

UNESCO course for secondary teachers on climate change education for sustainable development (Traiter le changement climatique en classe : cours de lUNESCO lintention des enseignants du secondaire sur lducation au changement climatique pour le dveloppement durable) ainsi que de nombreux autres outils portant sur lducation au changement climatique continueront dtre librement accessibles sur le site du centre dchange dinformation de lUNESCO sur lEDD .

14. LUNESCO favorisera les approches intersectorielles reliant lenseignement et la formation techniques et professionnels (EFTP) aux autres ODD pour aider les tats membres assurer une transition sans heurt vers des conomies vertes et numriques et, de manire plus gnrale, vers le dveloppement durable. LOrganisation adoptera de nouvelles lignes directrices sur le dveloppement des comptences vertes, visant permettre aux tats membres de tirer parti du processus de transition vers une conomie plus verte et faible mission de carbone, de crer des emplois dcents grande chelle et de promouvoir linclusion sociale. Conformment au Programme daction global pour lEDD, laction de lUNESCO en faveur du renforcement des capacits institutionnelles et professionnelles aidera les tats membres rendre lEFTP plus vert en procdant une transformation institutionnelle globale, qui consiste renforcer les capacits des dirigeants, des responsables de lducation et des enseignants afin de les aider mettre en uvre des rformes systmiques visant intgrer les concepts de durabilit dans lEFTP. Pour mener bien cet axe de travail, le Centre international UNESCO pour lenseignement et la formation techniques et professionnels (UNEVOC) laborera des directives adaptes et intgrera des formations au sein de son programme dencadrement de lEFTP .

15. En renforant les capacits des journalistes et des mdias radiotlviss dans le domaine du changement climatique, lUNESCO sensibilisera davantage lopinion publique aux drglements climatique et aux solutions dadaptation qui soffrent aux tats et aux communauts. Cela contribue galement informer le public des initiatives ou de labsence dinitiatives menes par les gouvernements et les entreprises pour faire face ces menaces. cette fin, la publication intitule Le changement climatique : Guide lintention des journalistes, qui a dj t utilise lors des formations organises dans le cadre de la COP-21 Paris et de la COP-22 Marrakech, sera pleinement mise profit .

16. Le cours en ligne ouvert tous de lUNESCO intitul Climate Justice: Lessons from the Global South (Justice climatique : les leons des pays du Sud ) contribuera galement amliorer la sensibilisation du public .

17. Plus gnralement, la libert dexpression, laccessibilit et louverture en matire de savoirs et dinformations, les technologies de linformation et de la communication (TIC), lexistence de mdias publics, privs et communautaires libres, en ligne comme ailleurs, sont essentiels au renforcement de laction climatique .

18. Dans le cadre du Projet de 39 C/5, lUNESCO prvoit de soutenir les efforts entrepris par les tats membres pour offrir aux apprenants, tout au long de leur vie, les connaissances, les comptences, les valeurs, les attitudes et les comportements qui leur sont ncessaires pour promouvoir le 201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annexe page 6 dveloppement durable et sengager en tant que citoyens du monde responsables. Pour cela, lOrganisation aidera les pays intgrer le dveloppement durable, y compris les questions lies au changement climatique, dans leurs politiques ducatives, leurs programmes scolaires, la formation de leurs enseignants et lvaluation de leurs lves (GP I, ER 6) .

19. En outre, lUNESCO prvoit de renforcer les capacits des mdias indpendants (GP V, ER 3), lutilisation innovante des TIC au service du dveloppement durable (GP V, ER 4) et les capacits des tats membres pour favoriser la cration de socits du savoir au service du dveloppement durable, y compris en ce qui concerne le changement climatique, par le biais de la mise en uvre des conclusions du Sommet mondial sur la socit de linformation (GP V, ER 6) .

B. Promouvoir la coopration interdisciplinaire sur les connaissances et la recherche scientifique relatives au climat aux fins de ladaptation au changement climatique et de lattnuation de ses effets

20. LUNESCO favorisera le renforcement continu de la base de connaissances interdisciplinaire sur le changement climatique, notamment par la production et lutilisation de donnes, dinformations et dalertes prcoces rationnelles et objectives, pour amliorer la rsilience des tats membres face aux drglements climatiques grce des politiques nationales et locales dadaptation, dattnuation et de gestion des risques en la matire, conformment leurs contributions dtermines au niveau national. cet effet, des actions dans le domaine des sciences de la durabilit favorisant la recherche sur le changement climatique seront entreprises, ainsi que des valuations et des activits de suivi, notamment dans le cadre de collaborations entre les diffrentes capacits de lUNESCO dans le domaine des sciences exactes et naturelles, des connaissances locales et autochtones, des systmes cologiques et socioculturels, de la culture, de lducation et de la communication et de linformation .

21. LUNESCO proposera et appuiera la fourniture de donnes et loffre de services dinformations relatives au climat notamment dans le domaine de la scurit de leau, des sciences de la terre, de la biodiversit et des ocans dans le cadre de son Programme hydrologique international (PHI), de son Programme international de gosciences (PICG), de son Programme sur lHomme et la biosphre (MAB), de son Programme Gestion des transformations sociales (MOST), de son Projet Systmes de savoirs locaux et autochtones (LINKS), de son Secteur de la communication et de linformation et de sa Commission ocanographique intergouvernementale (COI) .

B1. Ocan et climat

22. La COI de lUNESCO favorise le dveloppement des sciences de la mer, de lobservation des ocans et du renforcement des capacits pour suivre le rle cl des ocans dans le systme climatique et prvoir les changements les concernant. Ouvrant la voie des stratgies efficaces dadaptation et dattnuation, la COI sintresse aux effets les plus nfastes du changement climatique tels que lacidification, la hausse des tempratures et la dsoxygnation des ocans, llvation du niveau de la mer, les variations de prcipitations ou les changements observs dans la biodiversit marine. Les services fonds sur la science proposs par la COI aident les tats, en particulier les pays ctiers et les PEID, devenir plus rsilients face au changement climatique .

   

24. Grce la plate-forme internationale Ocan et Climat , la COI aidera la communaut ocanographique clairer les dbats organiss dans le cadre de la CCNUCC sur linteraction vitale entre le climat et les ocans .

25. Dans le cadre du Projet de 39 C/5, lUNESCO travers la COI prvoit daider les tats membres dvelopper et mettre en uvre des politiques fondes sur la science pour accrotre la rsilience et ladaptation au changement climatique, en contribuant au renforcement de leurs capacits institutionnelles et techniques. LOrganisation envisage aussi de contribuer faire mieux connatre les nouvelles problmatiques relatives au changement climatique et aux ocans, notamment en ce qui concerne les processus ocaniques ncessaires ladaptation au changement climatique, les normes et les mthodes pour observer lacidification des ocans et les cosystmes carbone bleu, et lamlioration de la comprhension du fonctionnement des cosystmes marins et des effets du changement et de la variabilit sur les services cosystmiques (COI, ER 1) .

B2. Leau et le climat

26. Le changement climatique entranera la rduction des ressources en eau douce et un accroissement de la concurrence pour laccs celles-ci. Le Programme hydrologique international (PHI) de lUNESCO favorisera la coopration scientifique et le dveloppement des sciences citoyennes pour valuer et surveiller lvolution des ressources en eau, sensibiliser les dcideurs aux risques associs et aux mesures permettant de sy prparer, et renforcer leurs capacits dans ce but. Il proposera galement des services hydroclimatiques en dveloppant et en appliquant, dans les rgions vulnrables et soumises au stress hydrique, des outils et des mthodes visant dfinir des mesures dadaptation et rduire les effets des scheresses et des inondations, ainsi quen encourageant la mise au point dapplications Web et mobiles permettant de surveiller les prcipitations et ltat des glaciers. Il dveloppera en outre la gestion durable des eaux souterraines, en tenant compte des changements climatiques et des effets humains associs. Linitiative internationale sur la qualit de leau (IIWQ) facilitera les dbats scientifiques et politiques concernant les effets du changement climatique sur la qualit des ressources en eau de la plante. Le PHI encouragera la gestion durable des ressources en eau au sein des tablissements humains et travaillera en coopration avec lAlliance des mgapoles pour leau et le climat. travers son rseau mondial de sites de dmonstration pour lcohydrologie, le PHI promouvra lutilisation de processus naturels existants en tant quoutils au service dune gestion amliore des cosystmes lis leau diffrentes chelles. Il favorisera la durabilit et la paix en mettant en avant la diplomatie de leau dans la gestion des ressources en eau transfrontires. Le Programme mondial pour lvaluation des ressources en eau (WWAP) de lUNESCO coordonnera llaboration du Rapport mondial sur la mise en valeur des ressources en eau des Nations Unies, qui fournit une valuation de ltat des ressources en eau douce de la plante et des outils pour promouvoir leur gestion durable .

27. Dans le contexte du Projet de 39 C/5, lUNESCO prvoit daider les tats membres renforcer leurs rponses et leur rsilience face aux dfis en matire de scurit de leau lis au changement climatique aux niveaux local, national et rgional, en vue de la ralisation des ODD et des cibles lis leau (GP II, ER 4) .

B3. Biodiversit et climat

28. Le changement climatique aura des consquences nfastes sur la biodiversit, alors mme que celle-ci joue un rle important dans ladaptation et la rsilience ce phnomne ainsi que dans lattnuation de ses effets. Le Programme sur lHomme et la biosphre (MAB) de lUNESCO sera le fer de lance de laction interdisciplinaire relative aux services cosystmiques et la conservation et lutilisation durable de la biodiversit notamment dans les forts, dont linfluence sur le climat mondial est capitale. Alliant sciences naturelles, sciences sociales, conomie et ducation pour amliorer les moyens de subsistance des populations et sauvegarder les cosystmes naturels et grs, le Programme MAB uvrera en faveur de ladaptation au changement climatique et de lattnuation de ses effets en favorisant le recours des approches intgres, multidisciplinaires et participatives parmi les rserves de biosphre .

201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annexe page 8

29. Les sites dsigns par lUNESCO et notamment le Rseau mondial des rserves de biosphre (669 sites rpartis sur 120 pays), les 147 biens inscrits sur la Liste du patrimoine mondial au titre de la valeur de leur biodiversit, aux termes de la Convention du patrimoine mondial de 1972, ou encore les goparcs mondiaux UNESCO forment un rseau unique et prcieux de sites qui sont autant de plates-formes de promotion des approches innovantes visant amliorer la conservation de la biodiversit tout en faisant face au changement climatique, dans un contexte gnral de dveloppement durable .

30. Dans le contexte du Projet de 39 C/5, lUNESCO aidera les tats membres renforcer la gestion de leurs ressources naturelles en vue de la ralisation des ODD en lien avec le Programme MAB et des cibles relatives la biodiversit et la rsilience face au changement climatique (GP II, ER 6), ainsi qu dvelopper lutilisation des rserves de biosphre et/ou des goparcs mondiaux UNESCO en tant que rseau global dobservatoires de la rsilience au changement climatique et aux risques naturels, en faisant appel aux sciences citoyennes (GP II, ER 7) .

B4. Rduction des risques de catastrophe

31. Les liens qui existent entre le changement climatique et la rduction des risques de catastrophe montrent combien il est ncessaire de dvelopper la rsilience des communauts face au changement climatique et aux phnomnes climatiques extrmes par le biais dune planification systmatique et du renforcement des capacits, ainsi quen tenant compte de lgalit des genres .

LUNESCO aidera les tats membres fournir des structures destines renforcer la coopration dans les domaines du partage de connaissances, de laide la dcision et de lducation aux fins de la prparation aux catastrophes et de lattnuation de leurs effets, et soutenir la poursuite du dveloppement des rseaux de rduction des risques et des systmes dalerte aux alas (tels que les ondes de tempte, les temptes, les inondations, les glissements de terrain et les scheresses) .

Laction de lUNESCO dans ce domaine appuiera le Cadre daction de Sendai pour la rduction des risques de catastrophe .

32. Dans le contexte du Projet de 39 C/5, et outre les actions relatives au rsultat escompt 4 du grand programme II et au rsultat escompt 1 de la COI (voir plus haut), lUNESCO aidera les tats membres renforcer la gestion de leurs ressources gologiques et des risques lis aux alas gologiques en vue de la ralisation des ODD et des cibles correspondants, notamment lODD 13 (GP II, ER 5) .

B5. Science, technologie et innovation

33. En tant que moteurs essentiels du dveloppement durable, la science, la technologie et linnovation jouent un rle crucial dans la lutte contre le changement climatique et lattnuation de ses effets. LUNESCO aidera les tats membres crer un environnement favorable au dveloppement de systmes et de politiques scientifiques, technologiques et dinnovation (STI) complets et au renforcement des capacits institutionnelles et humaines dans le domaine de la STI et de lingnierie en lien avec la lutte contre le changement climatique. En somme, les programmes de lUNESCO seront conus comme des plateformes de diffusion au service de plusieurs conventions internationales, et notamment de la CCNUCC, de lAccord de Paris conclu au titre de celle-ci, et de lODD 13 .

   

B6. Sciences sociales et humaines

35. Les rponses au changement climatique entranent dimportantes transformations dans les socits quil est important de comprendre et de soutenir grce aux sciences sociales et humaines, dans le cadre plus large de la science de la durabilit. Le programme MOST invitera les tats membres laborer des rponses socialement inclusives aux dfis lis au climat, ainsi qu collaborer troitement avec les acteurs de la recherche, en sappuyant sur linterdisciplinarit, pour mettre au point des concepts et des mthodes adapts lre de lAnthropocne .

36. Dans le contexte du Projet de 39 C/5, et conformment la stratgie du Programme MOST, lUNESCO collaborera avec les tats membres pour renforcer les capacits en matire de recherche et de politiques portant sur les dimensions sociales et humaines du changement climatique et pour encourager des politiques dadaptation inclusives qui tiennent compte des contextes nationaux et de leurs particularits (GP III, ER 1 et 2) .

B7. Savoirs locaux et autochtones

37. Limportance des savoirs autochtones dans la lutte contre le changement climatique, et en particulier dans ladaptation celui-ci, est au cur de lAccord de Paris. En tant quacteur cl des Nations Unies dans ce domaine, et conformment sa politique dengagement auprs des peuples autochtones, lUNESCO poursuivra la coopration engage de longue date avec ces derniers et avec les instances concernes telles que la CCNUCC, le GIEC et lOMM sur les bonnes pratiques et les mthodes permettant dintgrer les savoirs autochtones aux valuations et aux politiques .

38. Dans le contexte du Projet de 39 C/5, lUNESCO renforcera la reconnaissance et la mobilisation des savoirs locaux et autochtones lchelle mondiale, pour rpondre au changement climatique. LOrganisation dveloppera galement des partenariats largis au sein du systme des Nations Unies et consolidera les processus intergouvernementaux cls en matire de changement climatique, en mettant laccent sur les rgions vulnrables en la matire telles que lAfrique subsaharienne, les PEID et lArctique (GP II, ER 3) .

B8. Technologies de linformation et de la communication

39. Dans tous les domaines susmentionns, lUNESCO favorisera laccs universel linformation et au savoir ainsi que leur prservation, notamment grce aux TIC. Dans le contexte du Projet de 39 C/5, lUNESCO favorisera les solutions ouvertes et inclusives et encouragera lutilisation innovante des TIC au service du dveloppement durable, y compris en ce qui concerne laccs aux connaissances scientifiques et le changement climatique (GP V, ER 4) .

C. Promouvoir la diversit culturelle et la sauvegarde du patrimoine culturel aux fins de ladaptation au changement climatique et de lattnuation de ses effets

40. LUNESCO reconnat et fait valoir limportance des savoirs et de la diversit culturels. Le patrimoine culturel et la diversit sont en effet des moteurs essentiels pour la transformation et la rsilience des socits, lesquelles sont ncessaires pour faire face au changement climatique et promouvoir le dveloppement durable .

41. LUNESCO continuera soutenir les tats parties ses conventions dans le domaine de la culture et notamment ceux qui sont particulirement vulnrables aux consquences nfastes du changement climatique en renforant leurs capacits de sauvegarde du patrimoine, tant naturel que culturel et matriel quimmatriel, et en appliquant des mesures prventives et correctives pour combattre les effets du changement climatique sur leur patrimoine, telles que les activits de sensibilisation, le partage dinformations, de bonnes pratiques, dexpriences et denseignements tirs, ou encore le dveloppement de projets pilotes visant renforcer ladaptation et la rsilience au changement climatique, ainsi que lattnuation de ses effets .

201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annexe page 10

42. Dans le contexte du Projet de 39 C/5, lUNESCO prvoit daider les tats membres inclure systmatiquement des mesures relatives au dveloppement durable et au changement climatique dans la conservation et la gestion des biens inscrits sur la Liste du patrimoine mondial au titre de la Convention de 1972 (GP IV, ER 1), ainsi que dans les politiques et programmes en faveur de la sauvegarde du patrimoine culturel dans les situations durgence, notamment aux fins de la prparation et du relvement (GP IV, ER 5). LUNESCO aidera en outre les tats membres intgrer la culture leurs plans, leurs politiques et leurs programmes au service de la ralisation des ODD (GP IV, ER 8) .

D. Soutenir un dveloppement social inclusif, favoriser le dialogue interculturel et promouvoir des principes de prise en compte systmatique de lthique et de lgalit des genres en ce qui concerne ladaptation au changement climatique et lattnuation de ses effets

43. Les sciences sociales et humaines nous permettent de mieux comprendre les dfis actuels tels que le changement climatique, et nous aident y rpondre de manire plus efficace. LUNESCO soutiendra le dveloppement durable et inclusif, encouragera le dialogue interculturel et aidera les tats membres placer les droits de lhomme, lgalit des genres et les comportements thiques au cur des volutions sociales, scientifiques et technologiques qui transforment nos socits contemporaines, toujours plus complexes et diverses, notamment en raison du drglement climatique .

Privilgiant la formulation de conseils stratgiques et le renforcement des capacits, lUNESCO soutiendra directement les efforts fournis par les tats membres dans le cadre de lAccord de Paris et en vue de la ralisation de lODD 13. LOrganisation mettra particulirement laccent sur ladaptation au changement climatique avec une contribution importante de lthique, sappuyant sur la prparation dun projet de dclaration universelle de principes thiques relatifs au changement climatique et sur laction mene depuis dix ans par la Commission mondiale dthique des connaissances scientifiques et des technologies sur ces questions .

44. Dans le contexte du Projet de 39 C/5, lUNESCO soutiendra le renforcement, au sein des tats membres, de la formulation de politiques publiques relatives au climat sappuyant sur des donnes scientifiques, des connaissances fondes sur les sciences humaines, ainsi que sur lthique et les cadres relatifs aux droits de lhomme (GP III, ER 1). LOrganisation favorisera galement le dveloppement des capacits institutionnelles et humaines tous les niveaux pour gnrer, grer et appliquer des connaissances pertinentes dans le domaine du changement climatique, aux fins dun dveloppement inclusif et quitable fond sur les valeurs thiques et les droits de lhomme (GP III, ER 2). En ce qui concerne lgalit des genres, lUNESCO intgrera systmatiquement des considrations en la matire lensemble de ses actions contre le changement climatique et garantira le respect de la parit entre les sexes dans les processus dcisionnels, afin de veiller ce que les perspectives fminines et masculines soient prises en compte dans les solutions labores pour promouvoir un dveloppement quitable et durable .

IV. LE CHANGEMENT CLIMATIQUE AU SEIN DES PRIORITS GLOBALES

ET DES GROUPES CIBLES PRIORITAIRES DE LUNESCO

IV.1 Priorit globale galit des genres

45. Comme le Groupe dexpert intergouvernemental sur lvolution du climat (GIEC) la dj indiqu en 2001, les incidences de lvolution du climat ne seront pas les mmes selon les rgions, les gnrations, les classes dge, les classes sociales, les groupes de revenus, les activits professionnelles et les sexes (GIEC, 2001). Les problmes sexospcifiques en cause sont notamment les suivants : (i) en raison du rle qui leur est attribu dans la socit et de la discrimination et de la pauvret qui les frappent, les femmes sont diffremment et plus gravement touches par le changement climatique et son incidence sur lagriculture, ainsi que par les catastrophes naturelles et les migrations quil engendre ; (ii) elles sont largement sous-reprsentes dans les processus de dcision relatifs au changement climatique, aux missions de gaz effet de serre et aux activits dadaptation et dattnuation ; (iii) il existe un dsquilibre important entre hommes et femmes en ce qui 201 EX/5 Part I (B) Annexe page 11 concerne les missions de carbone et, par l mme, lempreinte carbonique due la production conomique et au mode de consommation des hommes et des femmes .

46. Les femmes subissant de manire disproportionne les effets de la pauvret, elles souffrent galement davantage lorsque des conditions climatiques capricieuses provoquent des scheresses ou des inondations sur les terres marginales ou dans les zones urbaines trs peuples, o la pauvret se ressent le plus. Si des donnes concrtes mettent en vidence la vulnrabilit des femmes au changement climatique, il nest par ailleurs plus dmontrer que ces dernires contribuent de faon importante aider leurs familles et leurs communauts sadapter au changement climatique et en attnuer les effets. lchelle mondiale, ce sont les femmes qui soccupent trs majoritairement des tches agricoles, veillent aux ressources du mnage et dispensent les soins leur famille .

Ce sont galement elles qui ont pilot et qui continuent de le faire nombre de mesures parmi les plus novatrices pour faire face aux problmes environnementaux. Sur le plan local, elles apportent des formes particulires de capital social permettant dattnuer les effets des changements subis par lenvironnement, de sadapter ces changements et dy faire face, en sorganisant activement pendant et aprs les catastrophes pour aider leurs familles et leurs communauts .

47. Les femmes sont galement les mieux places pour induire des changements dans les comportements afin damliorer la gestion des risques de catastrophes, ainsi que pour participer aux efforts mener aprs les catastrophes et pour les diriger. Elles sont galement capables danalyser les risques et les vulnrabilits partir de leur propre point de vue et de contribuer de faon notable la cration et au contrle de systmes dalerte rapide. Leurs connaissances en matire de mesures dadaptation (traditionnelles et spcifiques leur milieu) constituent une ressource importante pour lducation au service du dveloppement durable. Les femmes tant des agents du changement efficaces dans le domaine du drglement climatique et de lattnuation des effets de celui-ci, ainsi que dans celui de lducation au service du dveloppement durable, le renforcement de leurs capacits pour rpondre lvolution du climat est un domaine daction primordial. Leur accs aux ressources ainsi que leur participation aux processus de dcisions et dlaboration des politiques relatives au changement climatique sont essentiels pour identifier leurs besoins et leurs priorits spcifiques, ainsi que pour tirer le meilleur parti de leurs connaissances et de leur expertise, y compris en ce qui concerne les pratiques traditionnelles .

48. Les femmes et les hommes nont pas le mme accs aux informations de sensibilisation du public, et notamment aux systmes dalerte rapide. Ces problmes dordre socital et culturel doivent tre pleinement pris en compte afin de garantir un accs vraiment universel linformation, en particulier si lon souhaite renforcer lgalit entre les sexes dans ce domaine crucial .

49. LUNESCO semploiera donc sensibiliser lopinion aux sexospecificits de ladaptation au changement climatique et de lattnuation de ses effets, notamment par la collecte et lutilisation de donnes ventiles par sexe, ainsi que par le recensement des profils dmission sexospcifiques et des diffrences entre les capacits et les stratgies dattnuation et dadaptation .

50. Comme cela a dj t mentionn plus haut, dans le ple thmatique prioritaire D, lUNESCO veillera ce que les considrations lies lgalit des genres soient systmatiquement intgres lensemble du processus de mise en uvre de la Stratgie de lUNESCO pour faire face au changement climatique, et sassurera notamment du respect de la parit entre les sexes dans les processus dcisionnels .

51. Sappuyant sur les informations figurant dans le Rapport mondial sur les sciences ocaniques, dont la publication est prvue en 2017, la COI fournira des donnes concernant le ratio hommes/femmes parmi les chercheurs dans les diffrents domaines des sciences ocaniques, y compris ceux travaillant sur la question du changement climatique. Ces donnes serviront de rfrence pour tablir les indicateurs de performance de lexercice biennal et les objectifs de la prochaine priode quadriennale .

201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annexe page 12

52. Dans le contexte du Projet de 39 C/5, lUNESCO favorisera les politiques lies au changement climatique prnant lgalit des genres et veillera contribuer de manire systmatique et intgre lgalit des genres et lautonomisation des femmes au travers de son action de lutte contre le changement climatique (priorit globale galit des genres, ER 1). LOrganisation encouragera galement laugmentation de la participation des femmes aux processus dcisionnels relatifs au changement climatique, aux missions de gaz effet de serre et aux activits dadaptation et dattnuation .

<

IV. 2 Changement climatique et priorit globale Afrique

53. Reconnaissant la menace que reprsente le drglement climatique pour le bien-tre futur de la population, les cosystmes et le dveloppement socioconomique en Afrique, et conscient de la vulnrabilit des systmes conomiques et productifs africains la variabilit et au changement climatiques, comme des faibles capacits de raction et dattnuation du continent dans ce domaine, lUNESCO semploiera outre sa contribution directe la base de connaissances rgionale renforcer lducation, les activits de sensibilisation et llaboration de politiques relatives au changement climatique dans les pays africains. Une attention particulire sera porte au dveloppement de politiques scientifiques et technologiques, comme indiqu dans la contribution de lUNESCO au Plan daction consolid de lAfrique dans le domaine de la science et la technologie .

54. Pour appuyer les stratgies dadaptation le long de la cte de lAfrique de lOuest, le Programme de gestion intgre des zones ctires de la COI actuellement en cours tiendra compte de la dimension humaine. Cet exemple de prise en compte de la dimension sociale et politique dans les projets scientifiques actuellement mens dans la rgion est appel se gnraliser .

55. La COI continuera de dvelopper les capacits de ses tats membres en Afrique en encourageant linnovation et lapprentissage, en facilitant le transfert de techniques marines et en fournissant des conseils scientifiques sur les politiques mener en vue dinstaurer une gouvernance et une gestion intgre des ocans .

56. Dans le domaine de leau, le Programme hydrologique international de lUNESCO conduit actuellement, dans toutes les rgions du continent, des projets portant sur la production de donnes et le renforcement des capacits lappui de la gestion de leau dans des conditions climatiques difficiles. Le PHI tudie galement les effets des changements observs lchelle mondiale sur les bassins fluviaux et les ressources en eaux souterraines, mettant laccent sur les aquifres transfrontires et les systmes deau souterraine, le renforcement des capacits de rsistance aux catastrophes climatiques (inondations et scheresses) et les besoins en eau urbaine. Parmi ces projets, figure la premire valuation pluridisciplinaire jamais ralise des ressources en eaux souterraines de 199 aquifres transfrontires, ainsi que le dveloppement et la mise en uvre dun projet exprimental de surveillance de la scheresse en Afrique qui assure, quasiment en temps rel, un suivi de la situation hydrologique en surface laide dune modlisation fonde sur un systme de dtection distance, pour amliorer le renforcement des capacits et ladaptation au changement climatique .

57. Les rserves de biosphre africaines en particulier celles situes en Afrique centrale et dans le bassin du Congo feront lobjet de projets pilotes visant rduire les missions dues au dboisement et la dgradation des forts (REDD+), lobjectif tant dattnuer les effets du changement climatique .

   

de savoirs autochtones et les scientifiques, afin quils produisent ensemble des connaissances permettant de relever les dfis du changement climatique mondial (GP II, ER 3). LUNESCO, dans le cadre de sa priorit globale Afrique, fera galement la promotion des bassins ou des cadres de coopration hydrographiques ou hydrogologiques, des initiatives transfrontalires pour des rserves de biosphre, des sites du patrimoine mondial ou des goparcs mondiaux UNESCO soutenues par un processus de concertation et de coordination au sein dun cadre de coopration et de gestion appropri et dateliers visant renforcer les capacits, la comprhension et le respect mutuels entre les dtenteurs de savoirs autochtones et les scientifiques, en particulier les spcialistes du changement climatique (GP II, ER 4) .

IV.3 Le changement climatique dans le plan daction de lUNESCO pour les PEID

59. Dans un environnement mondial en constante mutation, notamment cause du changement climatique, les petits tats insulaires en dveloppement (PEID) se trouvent en grande difficult en raison de leur dpendance continue vis--vis des ressources naturelles, afin dassurer la scurit alimentaire, la sant et les moyens de subsistance de leurs habitants. Le passage du cyclone Pam en 2015 Vanuatu et, plus rcemment, celui du cyclone Winston aux Fidji ont mis en vidence ces difficults. Les consquences du changement environnemental qui touche la plante entire (inondations ctires entranes par llvation du niveau de la mer, scheresses, phnomnes climatiques extrmes, expansion urbaine ou industrielle, tablissement de zones protges) exacerbent les rivalits pour laccs la nourriture, leau et aux terres disponibles qui sont autant de ressources dj rares donnant lieu des situations conflictuelles au niveau local. Toutes ces raisons font la particularit des difficults auxquelles doivent faire face les PEID et placent leurs populations dans une situation de trs grande vulnrabilit .

60. Ces inquitudes spcifiques concernant les PEID ont t ritres par la communaut internationale loccasion de la troisime Confrence internationale sur les PEID (qui sest tenue Apia, Samoa, en septembre 2014), du Programme 2030 et de la 21e Confrence des Parties la CCNUCC. Les rsultats de ces manifestations ont contribu faonner le Plan daction de lUNESCO pour les PEID, qui sinscrit sur le long terme et que le Conseil excutif a approuv en 2016, sa 199e session .

61. Le Plan daction de lUNESCO consacr aux PEID propose un ensemble dobjectifs et de mesures de suivi pour rpondre aux vulnrabilits propres ces tats et aux difficults bien particulires auxquelles ils doivent faire face. Il tmoigne de lengagement de lUNESCO en faveur de la mise en uvre des Modalits daction acclres des PEID (Orientations de Samoa) et reflte les propositions contenues dans le Programme 2030, notamment les ODD correspondants et leurs cibles spcifiques, ainsi que les conclusions de lAccord de Paris. Le Plan daction reprend en effet de nombreux articles des Orientations de Samoa, en particulier celui intitul Changement climatique (paragraphes 31 46), et reflte la plupart des ODD ainsi que plusieurs de leurs cibles spcifiques, notamment lODD 13 .

62. Le Plan daction se concentre sur cinq domaines prioritaires et vise dvelopper les capacits humaines et institutionnelles des PEID par le biais de lducation et du renforcement des capacits, ainsi qu amliorer la rsilience et la durabilit de leurs cosystmes. Il a galement pour objectif de favoriser la transformation, linclusion et la justice sociale dans les PEID, dy prserver le patrimoine culturel et naturel matriel ou immatriel , dy promouvoir la culture au service du dveloppement durable et dy amliorer la connectivit, la gestion de linformation et le partage des connaissances. Il mobilise les comptences pluridisciplinaires de tous les secteurs de programme de lOrganisation, en vue de rpondre aux vulnrabilits propres ces tats et aux difficults particulires auxquelles ils doivent faire face, notamment en raison du changement climatique. Dans le cadre du Plan daction, lUNESCO travaillera en collaboration avec les PEID et leurs communauts pour garantir la gestion durable des ressources et du patrimoine naturels terrestres et marins aux niveaux rgional, national et local et ladaptation des individus, des communauts et des tats aux changements climatiques et environnementaux ainsi quaux risques naturels, et pour renforcer la prparation et les rponses aux catastrophes naturelles et leurs consquences sur les populations .

201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annexe page 14

63. Le projet Sandwatch figure parmi les actions proposes pour rduire la vulnrabilit des les et dvelopper leur rsilience face aux changements environnementaux plantaires. Par son approche MAST (mesurer, analyser, partager et agir) largie, participative et intgre, faisant appel la science citoyenne, le projet Sandwatch aide les communauts et les dcideurs anticiper les risques et concevoir ensemble des solutions potentielles dadaptation, afin de renforcer leurs capacits de rsilience et de contribuer au processus dvaluation mondiale .

64. Dans les rgions de PEID, le PHI soutiendra le dveloppement doutils dvaluation des ressources en eau douce de surface et souterraine fonds sur les donnes. Le PHI continuera de fournir des services hydroclimatiques ainsi que des outils de suivi et dalerte rapide en matire de scheresse et dinondations, et poursuivra lvaluation multidisciplinaire des eaux souterraines, actuellement mene dans 42 petits tats insulaires. Le Programme renforcera lducation et la sensibilisation leau dans les PEID tous les niveaux, en formant les chercheurs, les professionnels et les dcideurs et en mettant en place une plate-forme dchange dinformations au sein des rseaux rgionaux et mondiaux en vue damliorer la gestion des ressources en eau dans ces pays, tout en tenant compte des effets prvus du changement climatique sur ces ressources .

65. Lengagement de la COI en faveur des PEID sera orient par son Plan daction pour ces derniers, ainsi que par la Stratgie adopte en juin 2016 par ses tats membres en rponse aux Orientations de Samoa. Elle mettra laccent sur la mise en place dactions menes par les PEID euxmmes, portant sur les systmes dalerte rapides aux risques ctiers, le dveloppement de leurs capacits dans le domaine des sciences et des technologies ocanographiques, et le renforcement de la coopration en matire dvaluation des effets de lacidification des ocans .

66. Le Cadre daction de Sendai pour la rduction des risques de catastrophe 2015-2030 insiste sur la coopration internationale, rgionale, sous-rgionale et transfrontalire et prconise une approche prventive plus large privilgiant davantage la dimension humaine. Il dfinit sept objectifs mondiaux, parmi lesquels la ncessit de considrablement accrotre laide aux pays en dveloppement afin de complter laction quils mnent lchelle nationale et de garantir laccs aux dispositifs dalerte rapide multirisque et aux informations et valuations relatives au risque de catastrophe dici 2030. Le systme dalerte aux alas de la COI rpond parfaitement aux exigences du Cadre daction de Sendai et savre particulirement utile dans le cas des PEID et des pays ctiers de basse altitude .

67. Dans le contexte du Projet de 39 C/5, lUNESCO renforcera la surveillance et la rsilience environnementales, notamment grce la science citoyenne et lenseignement des sciences, comme en tmoignent les programmes de renforcement du suivi communautaire des changements environnementaux, y compris du changement climatique (GP II, ER 3) .

IV.4 La jeunesse un acteur part entire pour comprendre le changement climatique et y faire face

   

69. La jeunesse incarne le prsent et le futur de notre plante. On compte actuellement 1,8 milliard de jeunes gs entre 10 et 24 ans dans le monde. Jamais les jeunes nont t aussi nombreux et, dans de nombreux pays, ils composent la majorit de la population. La jeunesse daujourdhui na jamais t aussi instruite et sensibilise aux questions sociales et environnementales. Elle a le pouvoir de changer les socits pour les acheminer vers un avenir rsilient au changement climatique .

La jeunesse doit donc jouer un rle de premier plan dans la comprhension du changement climatique et dans llaboration de solutions pour y faire face .

70. Conformment sa Stratgie oprationnelle pour la jeunesse 2014-2021, lUNESCO affirmera le rle des jeunes dans la conduite du changement, mettant profit leur nergie et leurs ides pour rpondre la crise climatique. LOrganisation mobilisera ses rseaux de jeunesse, et notamment de jeunes scientifiques, pour promouvoir ladaptation au changement climatique et lattnuation de ses effets en favorisant leur participation en tant que dtenteurs de savoirs, innovateurs et leaders aux processus dlaboration des politiques ainsi quaux campagnes dducation et de sensibilisation du public. La priorit sera particulirement accorde au renforcement des capacits des jeunes, afin den faire les forces vives actuelles et futures du dveloppement durable et de lconomie et de la croissance vertes. Ces actions permettront non seulement de faire face au changement climatique sur le long terme, mais aussi de rpondre aux principales proccupations concernant lemployabilit des jeunes et leurs moyens de subsistance, et renforceront leur inclusion et leur prise en compte en tant quacteurs cl du dveloppement de nos socits .

71. Dans le contexte du Projet de 39 C/5, lUNESCO encouragera les actions, les initiatives les organisations et les rseaux dvelopps par les jeunes des deux sexes, depuis le niveau local jusquau niveau mondial, pour faire face aux dfis du changement climatique (GP III, ER 3) .

V. MODALITS DE MISE EN UVRE

72. La Stratgie sera mise en uvre au travers dactions entreprises dans le cadre des grands programmes de lOrganisation et de cooprations intersectorielles et entre programmes qui mobiliseront le Sige et les Bureaux hors Sige de lUNESCO et seront organises par lquipe spciale intersectorielle de lUNESCO sur le changement climatique. cette fin, les sites dsigns par lUNESCO (rserves de biosphre, goparcs mondiaux UNESCO et sites du patrimoine mondial) seront largement mis profit .

A. Les programmes internationaux et intergouvernementaux de lUNESCO, la COI, ainsi que leurs rseaux et partenaires

73. Les programmes scientifiques internationaux et intergouvernementaux (MAB, PHI, PICG, PISF, LINKS et MOST), ainsi que la COI, participeront pleinement la mise en uvre de la Stratgie, notamment au moyen dactivits conjointes spcialises. Au travers de ces programmes, lUNESCO mobilisera galement la communaut universitaire internationale autour dactions communes portant sur le changement climatique .

B. Coopration avec les organismes des Nations Unies, notamment avec la CCNUCC et les pays htes de la COP

74. La Stratgie sera mise en uvre en synergie avec les organisations partenaires des Nations Unies, en vitant les risques de chevauchement et en conformit avec les principes fondamentaux communs pour une approche lchelle des Nations Unies en matire daction face au changement climatique (voir Encadr 1). LUNESCO devra galement mettre profit les ventuelles opportunits de partenariats avec le Secrtariat de la CCNUCC, en vue dactions dintrt commun dans le cadre de la mise en uvre de la Stratgie .

201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annexe page 16 Encadr 1. Principes fondamentaux communs pour une approche lchelle des Nations Unies en matire daction face au changement climatique* A. Soutenir et promouvoir le dveloppement durable inclusif pour tous, conformment aux normes et rgles communes des Nations Unies B. Favoriser laction intgre pour le climat, qui optimise les synergies et les cobnfices travers lensemble du Programme de dveloppement durable lhorizon 2030 C. Promouvoir et amplifier des actions ambitieuses et transformatrices dans le domaine du changement climatique D. Hirarchiser les collaborations interinstitutions et les actions conjointes pour un impact collectif plus important E. Renforcer la ractivit du systme des Nations Unies lgard des besoins des tats membres en matire changement climatique F. Fonder les actions du systme des Nations Unies dans le domaine du changement climatique sur les meilleures recherches scientifiques, donnes et connaissances en la matire G. Dvelopper et renforcer les partenariats, y compris avec des acteurs non tatiques H. Engager la responsabilit lchelle du systme des Nations Unies en matire daction climatique * Ces principes figurent dans lannexe VI du Rapport du Comit de haut niveau sur les programmes (HLCP), prsent au Conseil des chefs de secrtariat des organismes des Nations Unies pour la coordination (CCS), sa 31e session (document CEB/2016/4) .

http://www.unsceb.org/CEBPublicFiles/Common%20Core%20Principles%20for%20a%20UN%20System-wide%20Approach%20to%20Climate%20Action-ODS_0.pdf

75. Aprs les premiers succs engrangs dans le cadre de la COP-20, la COP-21 et la COP-22, lUNESCO au travers de linitiative de partenariat de lUNESCO pour la COP poursuivra sa coopration avec les pays htes de la COP en faveur de la mobilisation et de la participation des milieux scientifiques et ducatifs, des mdias, du secteur priv et du grand public, afin de renforcer la sensibilisation au changement climatique et les actions entreprises dans ce domaine en prvision, au cours et la suite des Confrences des Parties la CCNUCC .

C. Sites dsigns par lUNESCO (patrimoine mondial, rserves de biosphre, goparcs mondiaux UNESCO)

76. De par leur valeur emblmatique, les sites classs au patrimoine mondial, les rserves de biosphre dsignes par lUNESCO et les goparcs mondiaux UNESCO constituent une plateforme trs utile pour la mise en uvre de la Stratgie. Ils permettent en effet lchange dinformations portant sur les processus de suivi, dattnuation et dadaptation en cours dutilisation et dexprimentation et contribuent la sensibilisation du public aux effets du changement climatique sur les socits humaines et la diversit culturelle, sur la biodiversit et les services cosystmiques et sur le patrimoine mondial naturel et culturel. Rpartis dans diffrentes rgions, zones climatiques et cosystmes travers le monde, les sites dsigns par lUNESCO font office, lchelle mondiale, dobservatoires de terrain des effets du changement climatique, et permettent la collecte et la diffusion dinformations en la matire. Des tudes sont actuellement menes dans plusieurs dentre eux, dont les rsultats contribuent la mise au point de mesures appropries dadaptation et dattnuation. Parmi elles figurent la promotion dapplications durables des technologies relatives aux nergies renouvelables, de lefficacit nergtique et du partage des bonnes pratiques associes, sous rserve de lobtention de financements additionnels et conformment aux diffrents instruments normatifs .

201 EX/5 Part I (B) Annexe page 17

77. LUNESCO aide ses tats membres en tant que dpositaires souverains de ces sites dans leurs efforts pour concevoir des solutions de dveloppement durable grce au renforcement de leurs capacits, formuler des rponses aux nouveaux dfis de conservation poss par le changement climatique, laborer des politiques innovantes, mettre au point des stratgies de gestion adaptes, et reconnatre limportance des communauts rsilientes et des systmes de zones protges qui contribuent la sauvegarde de lenvironnement mondial et des socits humaines menacs par le changement climatique .

78. Enfin, en contribuant unir de faon efficace les efforts mens dans le cadre de lAccord de Paris et de lAgenda 2030, et en tablissant des synergies entre ces derniers et dautres conventions de lUNESCO relatives la culture, les sites dsigns par lUNESCO offrent lOrganisation un net avantage comparatif au sein du systme des Nations Unies .

D. Centres et chaires UNESCO

79. Toutes les chaires UNESCO et tous les centres UNESCO de catgories 1 et 2 concerns par le changement climatique seront encourags participer la mise en uvre de la Stratgie .

E. Commissions nationales pour lUNESCO

80. La russite de la Stratgie dpendra in fine de la mobilisation des acteurs et des parties prenantes au niveau national. Cest pourquoi les commissions nationales pour lUNESCO et les comits nationaux en lien avec les programmes intergouvernementaux de lOrganisation, de mme que les dlgations permanentes auprs de lUNESCO, ont un rle important jouer dans la mise en uvre de la Stratgie, notamment au travers de projets financs dans le cadre du Programme de participation de lUNESCO .

F. Autorits municipales et rgionales

81. Dici 2030, plus dun milliard de personnes habiteront dans une centaine de villes de trs grande taille et 60 % de la population mondiale vivra en zone urbaine. Daprs les projections, la croissance dmographique des prochaines dcennies sera plus importante dans les centres urbains, particulirement en Afrique. Les autorits municipales et rgionales entreprennent de plus en plus dinitiatives innovantes dans le domaine du changement climatique et de la durabilit. Prochainement, dans le cadre de la Stratgie, lUNESCO dveloppera ou renforcera des mcanismes destins tablir des partenariats efficaces avec plusieurs de ces autorits. Parmi ces partenariats figure lAlliance des mgapoles pour leau et le climat .

G. ONG, jeunesse rSEAU

82. LUNESCO, par le biais de son Comit de liaison ONG-UNESCO, de ses rseaux de jeunesse et de son Rseau du systme des coles associes de lUNESCO (rSEAU), ouvrira le dialogue avec la communaut mondiale des ONG, de la jeunesse et des tablissements scolaires autour de questions dintrt commun en lien avec les actions de promotion de la mise en uvre de la Stratgie .

<

H. Secteur priv

83. Compte tenu du rle absolument dterminant du secteur priv face aux dfis actuels et futurs en matire de changement climatique et de dveloppement durable, lUNESCO cherchera nouer ou maintenir des partenariats solides avec des acteurs du secteur priv ainsi quavec des organisations interprofessionnelles des secteurs de lindustrie, du commerce et de la finance concerns par ces questions et reconnus pour leurs actions dans ce domaine .

201 EX/5 Partie I (B) Annexe page 18

I. quipe spciale intersectorielle de lUNESCO sur le changement climatique

84. Lquipe spciale de lUNESCO sur le changement climatique a t cre par la Directrice gnrale en vue de faciliter la coopration et la coordination intersectorielles dans le cadre de la mise en uvre de la Stratgie de lUNESCO pour faire face au changement climatique et des activits de suivi qui y sont associes. Lquipe spciale, conduite par le Sous-Directeur gnral pour les sciences exactes et naturelles (ADG/SC), bnficie du soutien de deux coprsidents (lun provenant du SC/MAB et lautre du SHS). Elle veille galement la coordination, la cohrence et aux synergies avec lensemble du systme des Nations Unies dans le domaine du changement climatique, notamment avec la CCNUCC et le GIEC, et contribue aux efforts de mobilisation de ressources visant dvelopper les actions de lUNESCO pour faire face au changement climatique .

VI. ENVELOPPE BUDGTAIRE

85. Les ressources financires requises pour la mise en uvre de la Stratgie seront estimes et incluses dans le 39 C/5. La mise en uvre effective de la Stratgie actualise devrait dpendre en grande partie de la disponibilit de ressources extrabudgtaires. Par consquent, la Stratgie choisit de systmatiquement mettre laccent sur les activits pouvant tre intensifies, afin de pouvoir associer ressources ordinaires et extrabudgtaires de faon suivie, cohrente et structure. LOrganisation redoublera defforts pour accrotre le nombre de donateurs et dvelopper de nouveaux partenariats stratgiques. ce titre, des efforts sont actuellement mens pour renouveler laccrditation de lOrganisation auprs du Fonds pour ladaptation et du Fonds vert pour le climat. tant donn que, parmi les tats membres, de nombreux pays en dveloppement, et tout particulirement les plus vulnrables dentre eux, auront besoin de financements consquents pour mener bien leurs efforts dattnuation du changement climatique et dadaptation aux effets de celui-ci, lUNESCO sattachera servir dintermdiaire dsintress afin daider les tats membres obtenir des financements, tels que ceux offerts par le biais du Fonds pour ladaptation18 et du Fonds vert pour le climat voqus plus haut19 .

VII. COMMUNICATION ET SENSIBILISATION

86. Les actions entreprises pour mettre en uvre la Stratgie devront comporter des lments de communication et de sensibilisation. Ces lments devront tre pleinement conformes lnonc de mission de la Stratgie, intitul Changeons les esprits, pas le climat , ainsi qu ses objectifs .

Les plates-formes Web de lUNESCO et les rseaux sociaux seront mis contribution pour appuyer la Stratgie, notamment par le biais de la prparation dune base de messages et de ressources graphiques, qui seront mis disposition des tats membres et des partenaires de lOrganisation dans le cadre de la mise en uvre de la Stratgie. Une brochure spcialement consacre aux actions de lUNESCO dans le domaine du changement climatique et destine au grand public sera labore et rgulirement mise jour .

VIII. VALUATION ET SUIVI

87. La mise en uvre de la Stratgie fera lobjet dun suivi et de rapports rguliers dans le cadre des rapports statutaires priodiques aux organes directeurs. Une valuation de la mise en uvre de la Stratgie sera ralise, en coopration avec le Service dvaluation et daudit de lUNESCO (IOS) .

   

Tableau : Aperu schmatique de la Stratgie de lUNESCO pour faire face au changement climatique (2018-2021) Objectif Permettre aux tats membres de prendre des mesures durgence pour lutter contre le changement climatique et ses effets par lducation, les sciences, la culture, et linformation et la communication, conformment leurs contributions dtermines au niveau national respectives dans le cadre de lAccord de Paris adopt par la COP-21 ainsi que dans le contexte gnral du Programme de dveloppement durable lhorizon 2030 et de lODD 13 qui y est dfini .

   

Modalits de mise en uvre Conformment la Stratgie moyen terme de lUNESCO pour 2014-2021 (document 37 C/4) et au Projet de 39 C/5 pour 2018-2012 (par

exemple : GP I : ER 6 ; COI-ER ; GP II : ER 2-7 ; GP III : ER 1-3 ; GP IV : ER 1, ER 5, ER 8 ; GP V : ER 3-4, ER 6 ; Priorit globale galit des genres :

ER 1), la Stratgie sera mise en uvre au travers dactions entreprises dans le cadre des grands programmes de lOrganisation et de cooprations intersectorielles et entre programmes (MAB, PHI, PICG, PISF, LINKS et MOST), ainsi que par la COI, qui mobiliseront le Sige et les bureaux hors Sige de lUNESCO et seront organises par lquipe spciale intersectorielle de lUNESCO sur le changement climatique. Les sites dsigns par lUNESCO, ainsi que les centres et chaires de lUNESCO seront largement mis profit. La collaboration sera galement renforce avec les tats membres y compris avec les commissions nationales pour lUNESCO , les autorits rgionales et municipales, les organismes des Nations Unies notamment avec la CCNUCC et les pays htes de la COP , ainsi quavec les ONG et le secteur priv .

   

5 ,

   

C. 22- (-22) 200 EX/29 22- (-22) ( ) .

   

2016 . ( ) 7-18 2016 . () 1. -21 -22 2 .

VI 22 500 , ( 15 800 ), , 50 , - -, 110 . , 5 400 , , 1 200 .

. 3 .

-22 . , (), (ERI) , -22 -, , .

35 (25 -22, /-12 -1). , -22 3 .

22- (-22) : 12- , (/-12), 1- , (-1), 45- - (-45), 45- (-45), ( 1-2). : http://unfccc.int/meetings/marrakech_nov_2016/ meeting/9567.php -21 4 2016 . 9 2017 . 122 197 . : http://unfccc.int/paris_ agreement/items/9485.php 35 (25

-22, /-12 -1), , , :

2018 . , , () (), , 6 (, ), , , () , , , 201 EX/5 Part I (C) page 2 5 .

( 201 EX/5 Part I (B)) .

6 .

-22: - . -22 , , , , 4 .

: -22II .

(U4C) , . -20 (, ) -21. , , , , , , . U4C .

-22, , -22 U4C, . 200 EX/30 201 EX/5 Part I (D) , -22 .

-22 9 .

, : , , , , , , , , , , , . , , -22 , , , , 9.5 ( ). : http://unfccc.int/2860.php#auv , -22, », () (http://unfccc.int/files/meetings/marrakech_nov_2016/application/pdf/ndcpartnership_launch_release_en.pdf), , 2017 . 2020 . , , . (http://unfccc.int/files/ paris_agreement/application/pdf/marrakech_partnership_for_global_climate_action.pdf) - , , 18 2016 . https://goo.gl/RrBSgy

   

-22 . ( , ) .

10. -22

(. ):

-22 , . : 2016-2021 . .

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/media-services/single-view/news/the_ocean_center_ stage_at_the_un_cop22_climate_talks_a_stra/ -22 , . , 9 2016 . () , .

, .

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0024/002454/245419E.pdf iRain: , .

http://en.unesco.org/news/irain-new-mobile-app-promote-citizen-science-and-supportwater-management : : : , , , .

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/education/resources/online-materials/singleview/news/un_climate_summit_says_education_primes_societies_for_global/ , . 2016 . . 2017 . .

http://en.unesco.org/news/unesco-green-citizens-exhibition-begins-its-tour-morocco , .

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/media-services/single-view/news/women_provide_key_ solutions_to_climate_change_challenges_and/ 201 EX/5 Part I (C) page 4 (, ) .

http://en.unesco.org/news/tangier-appeal-biosphere-reserves-climate-change-observatories-and-laboratories-sustainable .

http://andzoa.ma/fr/2016/11/15/cop22-presentation-de-linitiative-oasis-durables-par-mle-ministre-de-lagriculture/ .

http://www.unesco.org/new/fr/rabat/about-the-office/single-view/news/signature_dune_ convention_cadre_de_partenariat_unesco_c/ 2016 .

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0024/002458/245825e.pdf -22 - .

http://en.unesco.org/news/risk-management-approach-needed-fulfill-promise-paris-climate-agreement

   

11. -22 2017 . (-23), 6-17 2017 . (), . , -23 , .

U4C .

12. :

,

   

-23 ;

   

DETAILED INFORMATION ON UNESCOS CONTRIBUTION TO COP 22

1. This Annex contains detailed information on UNESCOs activities in the lead-up to and during COP 22 organized under the overall motto of Changing Minds, Not the Climate Education, Science, Culture, Communication and Information for Sustainable Development. Additional information can be found through the links provided in this document, as well as on the UNESCO COP 22 web page (http://en.unesco.org/cop22), and on the IOC COP 22 page (http://en.unesco.org/node/265595). For a general overview of UNESCOs climate change actions, please see the UNESCO climate change web page (http://en.unesco.org/themes/addressingclimate-change) and the 2016 UNESCO climate change brochure (http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0024/002459/245977e.pdf) .

I. Pre-COP 22 events

2. Key pre-COP 22 events organized by UNESCO or with UNESCO participation, include:

Africa Week on the theme African Women facing Climate Challenges, UNESCO Headquarters, 23-27 May 2016 .

The 2016 edition of African Week African Women facing Climate Challenges, began Monday 23 May at UNESCO in the presence of the Princess of Morocco, Her Royal Highness Lalla Hasnaa, the events sponsor, President of the African Group and Rwandan Ambassador to UNESCO, His Excellency Mr Jacques Kabal, UNESCOs Deputy Director-General, Mr Getachew Engida, and Assistant Director-General for Africa, Mr Firmin Edouard Matoko .

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/africa-department/resources/africa-department/news/launch_of_africa_week_2016_at_unesco_headquarters/ UNESCO Workshop on Science and Knowledge for Advancing the 2030 SDGs in the Arab Region, Cairo, Egypt, 25-26 May 2016 .

This workshop gathered experts from 10 Arab Countries, four regional organizations, two national science institutions concerned with STI, knowledge societies, and knowledge economy, and three regional offices of United Nations agencies. The main objective was to formulate a joint vision and outlines of a master plan for the effective activation and deployment of science and knowledge for achieving the SDGs, including on climate change, in the Arab region .

http://www.wfeo.org/unesco-workshop-science-knowledge-advancing-2030-sdgs-arabregion/ World Ocean Day 2016 at UNESCO, Paris, 8 June 2016 The annual World Ocean Day at IOC-UNESCO has become a symbolic day for Member States, the scientific community and civil society to gather and discuss the numerous challenges that connect the health of the ocean and the health of Earths climate. During World Oceans Day 2016, themed Healthy Ocean, Healthy Planet, the IOC organized round tables, exhibitions and a UNESCO Campus for youth, as well as the Roger Revelle Memorial Lecture dedicated this year to the issue of ocean acidification. The aim of the Day was to continue the momentum established by the global agreements on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement in the lead up to COP 22 in Marrakech .

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/prizes-and-celebrations/celebrations/international-days/world-oceans-day-2016/ 201 EX/5 Partie I (C) Annex page 2 Climate Services for Sustainable Water Management side event organized by IHP in collaboration with WMO within the High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development, United Nations, New York, 15 July 2016 .

The event brought together experts, policy-makers and practitioners to discuss advances and challenges in the use of data, technological and scientific advances in support of implementation and monitoring of water-related SDGs .

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/allevents/?tx_browser_pi1%5BshowUid%5D=40397&cHash=20e246f922 MedCOP Climate 2016, Tangier, Morocco, 18-19 July 2016 .

MedCOP gathered representatives from Mediterranean countries, the private sector, civil society, as well as regional and international organizations, including the UNESCO Rabat Office, with the objective to highlight existing initiatives related to climate action in the region and to formulate innovative ideas by associations of local, national and regional society networks. http://medcopclimat.com/en First meeting of the Ad Hoc Expert Group (AHEG) for the Elaboration of a Preliminary Text of a non-binding Declaration on the Ethical Principles in relation to Climate Change, Rabat, Morocco, 20-24 September 2016 .

In accordance with 38 C/Resolution 42, a declaration on ethical principles in relation to climate change is to complement existing reference instruments and its preparation is to be carried out in cooperation with the World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology (COMEST), in consultation with Member States and taking into consideration the outcome of negotiations within the framework of the COP 21 and COP 22. At the generous invitation of the Government of the Kingdom of Morocco, the first meeting of the group of experts was held in Rabat from 20 to 24 September 2016, with a strong support of the Moroccan National Commission for Education, Sciences and Culture. During this meeting, the AHEG prepared the first draft of a preliminary text of a declaration .

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/media-services/single-view/news/member_states_invited_to_comment_on_first_draft_of_the_decla/ International Conference on Facing Climate Change A New Political Era?, Marrakech, Morocco, 18-20 October 2016 .

The event was organized by the Royal Academy of Morocco and the Fondation de lcologie politique (France), involving high-level personalities of the Moroccan COP 22 Steering Committee, as well as Mr Nicolas Hulot, President of the Fondation Hulot (France). UNESCO took an active part in presenting and discussing the first draft of the Preliminary Text of a non-binding Declaration on the Ethical Principles in relation to Climate Change. This was a good opportunity to share the draft Declaration with some international civil society actors on the ground .

http://www.fondationecolo.org/activites/evenements/Colloque-COP22-a-Marrakech

   

WaterLinks Forum 2016 High-Level Seminar on Megacities, Water and Climate Change organized by WaterLinks and IHP, Manilla, Philippines, 5 October 2016. WaterLinks Forum 2016 was a two-day congregation of operators, utilities, policy-makers, thought-leaders, tech providers and stakeholders from the urban water, sanitation and wastewater sectors principally from across Asia and the Pacific. It was a venue for generating practical solutions, cultivating innovations, and inspiring synergies to address present and future challenges in Asias water operations particularly challenges stemming from climate risks and uncertainties .

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/allevents/?tx_browser_pi1%5BshowUid%5D=40928&cHash=334f83b4dd First Joint Arab-African Meeting of UNESCOs International Hydrological Programme (IHP) and Man and the Biosphere (MAB) Programme: Towards COP22 and Sustainable Development Goals, Tangiers, Morocco, 18-20 October 2016 .

The meeting brought together over 100 participants from 18 countries of the African and Arab States regions, including biosphere reserve managers, IHP focal points, members of the scientific community, local authorities and civil society. The meeting adopted the Tangier Appeal for Biosphere Reserves as Climate Change Observatories and Laboratories for Sustainable Development in Africa and the Arab States that was presented at a COP 22 side event. https://en.unesco.org/news/tangier-appeal-biosphere-reserves-climate-change-observatories-and-laboratories-sustainable Launching of the Water, Megacities & Global Change Publication: at Habitat III. Quito, Ecuador, 19 October 2016. UNESCO, launched the publication on Megacities, water and climate change that discusses challenges faced and best practices that can be replicated when dealing with water resources management and the pressure applied by climate change while having to provide basic services to millions of people .

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0024/002454/245419E.pdf Climate change and urban disaster resilience: UNESCO, WMO and UNU session at Habitat III, Quito, Ecuador, 20 October 2016 .

Risks of disaster are on the rise in cities due to the intersection of two global megatrends:

urbanization and climate change. The side event provided a state-of-the-art overview and reflection on knowledge-based solutions for improving urban resilience and reducing urban risks from natural and climatic hazards .

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/allevents/?tx_browser_pi1%5BshowUid%5D=41006&cHash=4768870087 Launch of free Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Climate Justice: Lessons from the Global South, created by UNESCO. This course deals with some of the key issues related to the ethical dimensions implied by climate change learning especially from the problems faced as well as the resilience models formulated by the marginalized sectors of society or the so-called Global South .

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/climate-justice International Conference on Indigenous Knowledge and Climate Change, Marrakech, Morocco, 2-3 November 2016 .

Organized by UNESCO Climate Frontlines, CNRS, the Indigenous Peoples of Africa Coordinating Committee (IPACC), the Indigenous Peoples International Centre for Policy Research and Education (TEBTEBBA), the conference brought together some of the worlds leading experts from indigenous peoples, researchers and governments. Speakers provided testimonies about how local communities are grappling with impacts exacerbated by climate change, their efforts to adapt but also the constraints and limits that they are facing, and case studies that highlight how indigenous and local knowledge can be sources of renewed understanding, resilience and resistance .

http://en.unesco.org/events/indigenous-knowledge-and-climate-change 201 EX/5 Partie I (C) Annex page 4 Summit of Climate Conscience, Fez, Morocco, 3 November 2016 .

Under the patronage of His Majesty King Mohammed VI, the Summit, which was initiated by the Economic, Social and Environmental Council (CESE), Morocco, aimed to contribute to laying the foundations for a new ecological consciousness. UNESCO was represented at the Summit, which included a number of religious leaders and thinkers, through the Assistant Director-General for Natural Sciences (ADG/SC), Flavia Schlegel .

II. Events and activities during COP 22

3. The UNESCO Delegation to Marrakech Climate Change Conference attended formal negotiation sessions in the blue zone of COP 22 as observers with special attention given to items relevant to the mandates of the organization. UNESCO also actively organized, participated in or attended a large number of side events in the blue, as well as in the green, civil society zone of COP 22 open to all COP 22 delegates and the public at large. Several events were also staged in the wider Marrakech area .

4. As part of the coordinated One-UN approach to the UNFCCC COPs, UNESCO attended several United Nations COP 22 coordination meetings, chaired by the UNFCCC Secretariat, and helped organize the joint United Nations exhibit stand in the blue zone on education and public awareness focusing on Sustainable Development Goal 4 on Quality Education. UNESCO publications related to climate change were also made available on an USB memory stick that comprised documents by a large number of United Nations bodies and distributed at the COP 22 venues .

II.I UNESCO COP 22 Pavilion

5. Throughout COP 22, UNESCO had its own pavilion in the civil society area of the green zone flagging the Organizations motto: Changing Minds, Not the Climate Education, Science, Culture, Communication and Information for Sustainable Development. UNESCO was the only United Nations agency with a pavilion in the civil society area and was also the only body to present a series of debates and conferences all day, every day. The UNESCO 100m2 COP 22 Pavilion was erected on 100m2 of floor space graciously allocated to UNESCO by the COP 22 host organizers, and equipped with multimedia facilities offering a unique space and opportunity for a great variety of stakeholders such as UNESCO experts, representatives of other United Nations agencies, UNESCO partners, civil society and the general public, including entire school classes, to gather and exchange on main issues related to climate change .

6. The UNESCO Pavilion was also the venue for several high-level discussions and bilateral meetings involving senior UNESCO representatives, including the Director-General. High-level visitors to the UNESCO Pavilion included: Her Royal Highness Princess Lalla Hasnaa of Morocco, President of the Mohammed VI Foundation for Environmental Protection; Mr Salaheddine Mezouar, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation of Morocco and President-Designate of the COP 22;

Mr Driss El Yazami, President of the National Human Rights Council (CNDH) and the Council for the Moroccan Community Abroad (CCME) and Member of the Moroccan COP 22 Steering Committee in charge of Civil Society; Ms Fatema Marouane. Minister of Crafts, Social and Solidarity Economy, Morocco; Ms Zohour Alaoui, Ambassador, Permanent Delegate of Morocco to UNESCO; Mr Dwight L. Bush Sr. Ambassador of the US to Morocco; Mr Sydney Alexander Samuels Milson, Minister of Environment and Natural Resources, Guatemala .

   

II.II Overview of UNESCO activities at the UNESCO COP 22 Pavilion, at other COP 22 venues and in the City of Marrakech II.II.A Local and indigenous knowledge

8. Prior to COP-22, UNESCO-LINKS together with CNRS and in partnership with IPACC and Tebtebba organized on 2-3 November 2016, the International expert conference on Indigenous Knowledge and Climate Change (see above) .

9. On 7 November at the UNESCO Pavilion, speakers, welcomed by ADG/SC, came together to share key messages from the conference. Drawing on experiences from across the United Nations, speakers on the first panel gave their perspectives on how indigenous knowledge could be considered within the mandate of the UNFCCC, in particular within the context of ongoing consultations on the establishment of an indigenous platform. Participation of indigenous peoples was seen as a key enabling factor, and speakers also recommended a diversity of activities that could be encompassed under the platform .

10. The panels that followed were dedicated to indigenous knowledge in adaptation and mitigation .

While highlighting the contributions of indigenous knowledge, the case studies presented demonstrated the diversity of these place-based knowledge systems and how they complement Western science approaches to building both resilience and self-determined development in communities most affected by climate change .

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/natural-sciences/about-us/single-view/news/indigenous_peoples_we_must_work_together_to_address_climate/

II.II.B UNESCO sites

11. The iconic UNESCO-designated World Heritage properties, biosphere reserves and global geoparks provide useful platforms to apply and test climate monitoring, mitigation and adaptation, and to raise awareness on climate change impacts on human societies, cultural diversity, biodiversity, ecosystem services, and the worlds natural and cultural heritage. Spread across different regions, climates and ecosystems around the world, the impacts of climate change are already being felt in many UNESCO-designated properties. Some communities there are working on innovative ways to address climate change, while some other communities traditional management systems and resilience can be a source of inspiration. As climate change observatories, many UNESCO-designated properties also contribute to mitigation solutions including by promoting green economies and the sustainable use of renewable energy sources .

12. Organized by UNESCOs Division of Ecological and Earth Sciences and its MAB Secretariat, in cooperation with the World Heritage Centre, the sessions held at the UNESCO Pavilion during the 201 EX/5 Partie I (C) Annex page 6 thematic day on 8 November, which was opened by ADG/SC, served to explore how UNESCO designated sites can support the implementation of the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development through concrete actions on the ground .

https://en.unesco.org/sites/default/files/unescosites_10nov2016.pdf

13. Several other COP 22 events also focused on UNESCO Sites, notably the side event entitled Biosphere reserves: climate change observatories and laboratories of sustainable development organized at Moroccan COP 22 Pavilion. With the participation of ADG/SC this event launched the Tangier Appeal for Biosphere Reserves as climate change observatories and laboratories for sustainable development in Africa and the Arab States .

http://en.unesco.org/news/tangier-appeal-biosphere-reserves-climate-change-observatories-andlaboratories-sustainable

14. Another event was the ceremony at the Cervantes Institute in Marrakech on 17 November when Spain and the Abertis Foundation presented its International UNESCO Centre for Mediterranean Biosphere Reserves, Castellet Castle near Barcelona .

http://www.fundacioabertis.org/en/the-abertis-foundation-has-presented-its-UNESCO-centre-formediterranean-biosphere-reserves-in-marrakech/

II.II.C Water

15. The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) stated that climate change over the twenty-first century is projected to reduce renewable surface water and groundwater resources significantly in most dry subtropical regions, intensifying competition for water among sectors. In many regions, changing precipitation or melting perennial snow and ice are altering hydrological systems, affecting the quantity and quality of water resources .

16. UNESCOs International Hydrological Programme (IHP) organized a comprehensive series of events during COP 22 to provide information and technical resources about its work on water and climate change (see also document 201 EX/5 Part I (D)) .

17. UNESCO IHP co-organized a high-level event on the 9 November 2016 under the framework of the Global Climate Action Agenda (GCAA), which brought together government representatives and non-state actors to assess progress made since COP21 and reinforce cooperation to tackle water and climate challenges. The opening included speeches by Abdeladim Lhlafi, Commissioner of COP 22, together with UNESCOs Assistant Director-General, Flavia Schelgel, Moroccos Champion for the Climate, Hakima El Haite, Moroccos Minister Delegate in charge of water, Charafat Afailal, and the World Water Council .

18. During the Water Day at the UNESCO Pavilion on 9 November, special attention was given to the use of new technologies to support stakeholders engagement in tackling impacts of climate change in water resources. For instance, the first global real-time crowd-sourced rainfall observation system, the iRain application, was launched at the UNESCO pavilion, and a session focused on UNESCOs open source software platform of experts on hydrology, the HOPE Initiative. Strong focus was also given to Megacities and on gender and water .

19. Other highlights included events on: Fostering SDG#8: Innovative Job Creation and Young Water Professionals Role (8 November); Scientific knowledge on water and climate for smart planning and decision-making, involving a representative from the GEM Report on the importance of education for building relevant skills of young professionals in the sector (8 November); Improve stakeholder engagement in decision making to combat extreme flood and drought impacts of climate change (8 November); Global Climate Action Agenda Water Event, with the participation of the Director-General (9 November); Ceremony for the signing of the declaration between the Megacities Alliance, RIOB and the Business Alliance (9 November); and UN-WATER: Hydro-Climate Services for All (9 November) .

https://en.unesco.org/cop22/water-climate-day 201 EX/5 Partie I (C) Annex page 7

II.II.D Ocean

20. The importance of the ocean to global climate must not be underestimated. It absorbs a significant part of carbon and an overwhelming portion of the planets excess heat. Warmer atmosphere and increasing concentration of greenhouse gases nevertheless exert enormous pressure on the oceans ability to regulate the climate .

21. IOC sessions at the UNESCO Pavilion focused on Restoration of Blue Carbon Ecosystems and on reducing risks and saving lives from ocean and coastal hazards in a changing climate. The Executive Secretary of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission and Assistant Director General of UNESCO, Mr Vladimir Ryabinin opened the Ocean Day at the UNESCO Pavilion .

22. Throughout the COP, IOC engaged with a number of important event stressing the importance of the Ocean, such as: Oceans Action Day at COP 22 (12 November); Incorporating Blue Carbon Into Nationally Determined Contributions Under the Paris Agreement Coastal blue carbon ecosystems (8 November); EarthInfo Day (Observing for Climate) (8 November); Changing oceans and

seas around the world: implications for mitigation and adaptation (9 November); SDG14: Oceans:



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 |
 >>  -
:

() . () () - . 25 29 2015 . ...

. " / 33" 2012 . " / 33", : 1. 2013 .2. ...

-2013 66. 1 (0) ...

III , " . " 10 2013 11 2013 . ., , . ...

: / . . ... : , 2012..321. .., . ...

(-) " ", . ( ), 30 04 2008 . 1- . ...

"" , , II- - . , 31 2017 . 001 72 56 56 , , . ...

73 - 2-7 2015 " : " 3 2015 . (.. ) ...

...

XVII , XXI . , 6 7 2017 XXI / / 6-7 2017 . . .. ...

VII 29 3 2016 . II ISSUES OF FAR EASTERN LITERATURES The 7th International Conference June 29 July 3, 2016 Volume 2 - Saint P...

3 (36) 2016 : www.crcrussia.com : churchofchrist.ru . : " ...

1. Li, S., Mooney, W., D., Fan, J., 2006. Crustal structure of mainland China from deep seismic sounding data. // Tectonophysics 420, 239 252.2. Yoo, H., Herrmann, R., Cho,...

. .. 6 ( 2017) IUSS Stimulus "Stimulus", ( ...

Shutterstock Jon Arnold Images Ltd/Alamy 5 | 2010 2010 /V. Martin - -, () ...

, . : . . , : " , ". ...

"- " : ...

170 XIX . . () , 1 , , , : , ...

" " ...

13 "08" 2015.: .. : .. (on-line) .. .. .. .. .. .....

, 20172030 , 20172030 , 20172030 15- ...

" ...

27 2017 . - Texas Instruments, Telit, Renesas, Invensense, Transcend Molex ARM-Event, , ...






 
<<     |    
2018 www.new.pdfm.ru - -

, .
, , , , 1-2 .